The 2019 Road Trip: The Final Chapter

And so it is time to put these series of blogs out of its misery.   It is time to end this long tale.  I have already said most of what I wanted to say for this last part of the trip, but I did that at the beginning of the story, and you may have already forgotten all of that.  I shall add to the original account that I gave.

After a nice breakfast, we departed the Silver Creek HotelPA170493.jpgand Bellevue for the Sawtooth Mountain National Recreation Area.  The weather was somewhat dreary.  The drive through the mountains was still spectacular, and a little challenging where snow was falling.  Many official facilities in the recreation area were already shut down for the winter, and there were very few people around.   I had planned for a hike at Redfish Lake to be a highlight of the day, but that did not pan out.  The plan finally fell apart at the starting point of the trail.  That impacted my mood the rest of the day.

The little town of Stanley was interesting.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA I posted this other picture of the town in the earlier blog, along with my sense of the town itself.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAStanley was the extent of our northward exploration on the Sawtooth Scenic Byway.PA170525.jpgWe stopped by the road for lunch on our way out of the park.  The traffic was so light, I was able to take this picture.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe took a short walk in a park along the Big Wood River just before we got to the towns of Sun Valley – Ketcham, Hailey, and Bellevue.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAPA170580.jpgWe did a hike at Shoshone Falls in Twin Falls.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt took us some effort to find the actual trail.  We started the walk not knowing where it would take us.  We ended up climbing out of the canyon to get a view of the Falls from a unique vantage point.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt looked like the trail extended beyond this point, but we did not explore any further.  We had started out the hike from a point just behind the waterfalls themselves.

We did stop at Dierkis Lake after that.  You can make out the faint outline of the lake at the top right hand corner of the picture above.  It is at the level of the top of the canyon.  Imagine the whole area being originally covered by water, and a river cutting out a canyon after the level of the water dropped, and water left behind from the ocean that previously existed in this space collected in a basin beside the canyon, thus forming a lake.  All this would have happened millions of years ago.  You can read about some of the geology of the place at the Wikipedia page for the Snake River.

By the time we got to Dierkis Lake, the late evening sun lit up the lake in a unique manner.  It turned out to be a small body of water.  Very few people were around.PA170632.jpgOur stop for the night was on the highway to Salt Lake City, at a place called Burley, in Idaho.  The town felt like a regular truck stop along the Interstate for travelers, with its chain motels, restaurants, fast food, and gas stations.  There was nothing remarkable about the place.  We stayed at a Best Western motel and had a simple dinner of “comfort food” (with a beverage, of course) at the Perkins restaurant attached to it.

We did a lot of driving the next day on the way to Salt Lake City.  The stop at Antelope Island was a bit of a disappointment.  Perhaps the experience might have been better if we were able to hike one of the more challenging trails.  The easier trails were not very well maintained.  Here is a picture taken from the park of Salt Lake City in the shadow of the Wasatch Mountains. I thought might be worth sharing.PA180688.jpgWe got to Salt Lake City that evening.

The sights that are in Salt Lake City itself can easily be covered on foot since it is a small place.  Our hotel was also close to downtown.

We spent the next day walking around the city.  Here are some more pictures from Temple Square, the area where the buildings of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Mormons) is located.  The building in the picture below is the chapel.  The wall represents the border of Temple Square itself.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe following picture was taken outside the Tabernacle.  We were waiting for a performance. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe tabernacle building has fantastic acoustics inside.  We could hear a piece of paper being shredded on the stage from far back in the room without any electronic amplification.PA190755.jpgThis is a picture of the famous Mormon temple of Salt Lake City.  It is the only space in the area of Temple Square considered sacred and not accessible to non-believers.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere were many couples getting married in the temple, and you could see some of the marriage parties gathered all around the building.PA190747.jpgThere are a few other buildings around Temple Square belonging to the Mormons, including a huge office building.  It is probably their headquarters.  In general, you get a sense that the Mormon faith does not ask for any level of asceticism in their practices.

Here are some pictures from our visit to the Utah State Capitol.  The following pictures were taken on the grounds of the facility.  You can see the Wasatch Mountains in the background.  To the right of the picture below is a memorial to Mormon pioneer volunteers who joined the U.S. Army during the Mexican War.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe picture below is taken from the entrance to the Capitol building.  (The entrance is actually to the side of the building rather than its front.)  The spire of the old City Hall appears on the right side in the picture below.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is the rotunda of the building itself.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe steps in the picture below lead to the offices of the governing officials, including the governor.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is a picture of the Capitol building taken as we departed the area.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe road from the Capitol building into the downtown area is called State Street.PA190801.jpgWe walked through the City Creek Center shopping center on the way back just because we had read about it.  It looked like any other mall.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe experienced a moment of minor excitement as were were walking back to the hotel. There was a loud sound behind us as we were walking near the station seen below.  (This was a little while before the train in the picture below arrived at the platform.)  We turned to see an older woman who was on a motorized wheelchair toppled over the rails.  She looked disheveled, and I am guessing that she was indigent.  She had been carrying some metal rods on the chair, and they had fallen off.  The footrest on her wheelchair had gotten snagged under the rails.  Luckily, a few of us were able to extricate her from the rails before the train arrived.  Traffic continued to flow around us.PA190817.jpgIn general, from what I saw, I thought that Salt Lake City seemed to have a more compassionate approach than some other places to dealing with the less well off people who are drawn to the bigger cities.  They did  not seem to be aggressive about chasing people away to make the tourists feel better about themselves.

It turned miserably cold on our last evening of the travels, and it started to rain.  After Mass at the Cathedral of the Madeline,PA190832.jpgwe went to dinner at a sushi place. After that, we topped off the gas tank in our rental car.  We had an early morning flight the next day, and there was a threat of early morning snow that could impact our ability to get things done in time and leave town in the morning.  I could feel the cold right down to my bones standing out it the cold at the gas station on a windy night, and was happy to get back to a warm room in the hotel!

Fortunately, the snow held off that night, and we were able to make it to the airport on time without a hassle.  The airport was crowded for that time of the morning.  We had an uneventful flight back home on a aircraft that was packed with travelers.

And that is how this story ends….

The 2019 Road Trip: Onward to Craters of the Moon and Sun Valley, Idaho

I was wondering whether to continue this series of blogs beyond our visits to Yellowstone and The Grand Tetons, considering that I had provided a synopsis of the rest of the trip a while back in this blog.  I changed my mind after looking once again at the pictures I had taken of Craters of the Moon.  For some reason, the awesomeness of what we had seen there did not register to its fullest extent until I saw these pictures once again.  So I am continuing the blog series for at least one more day of the trip.  I am not yet sure what lies beyond.  Without much ado, here goes!

(And before I forget, you do not get the full impact of the panoramic pictures without seeing them on a full screen. So, go ahead and click on them!)

This was our last morning in Victor, Idaho.  We had to clear out of the cabin that had been our home for four nights.  We, once again, made an eastbound crossing of the Teton Pass for what we thought would be the final time. We were heading to Jackson Hole Airport to drop off Angela.  After that, it would be just the two of us for the rest of the trip.

We went to the airport through the area of Grand Teton Park where the moose had been sighted by others on the first day of the visit to the park, giving it one last try!  We were unsuccessful in seeing moose yet again.

After the stop at the airport, we headed out for our tourist destination for the day – the Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve.   Unexpectedly, the route set out for us by our GPS device took us back over Teton Pass one last time, and into Victor.  We took a left turn at the only traffic light in Victor and headed west towards central Idaho.

The drive towards Craters of the Moon took us through all kinds of different terrain and surroundings.  There was first the forest land and the mountain pass that we went through coming out of Victor.  We then drove over flatland and past massive farms, with the road running close to the Snake River itself. We could have stopped at one of the lookout points overlooking the deep canyon in which the river ran, but did not do so since we had a long drive ahead.  The only significant population center along the way was the city of Idaho Falls.   We arrived at our destination after an extended drive through what looked like wasteland.  This space actually included the Idaho National Laboratory, a nuclear research facility.  (There is even a place in this part of Idaho called Atomic City. It has a population of less than 100 people.)

The area of Craters of the Moon has a distinctive landscape that is quite different from what you see in the space around it.  It is interesting that the activity from within the mantle of the earth manages to escape to the surface in just this small area.  As I noted in the earlier blog, such activity happens approximately once every 2000 years, and we are due for some action any time now!

The park itself is a small one to drive through.  We had enough time to do a couple of walks.  The road through the park has turnouts at which you can pull over to visit some specific sites.  We headed out after watching a video in the visitor center.

The first stop near the visitor center was to see the North Crater lava flow area.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe walked up to the formations that you see in the above picture. They are called cinder cone fragments.  They are from the side of a volcanic cone that broke apart. They were carried to the place where we see them now by the flow of lava that resulted.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAYou can see the nature of the rocks in the flow as you get closer.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAInterestingly enough, some of the rocks that we encountered in the park were extremely light.  These were the ones that contained air pockets that were created by the hot gases caught within the rock when it was being formed from molten material.

The picture below shows our car parked along the road when we took the walk to see the cinder cone fragments.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe made a stop at Inferno Cone.  The black sand that forms the outer coating of this cone was quite fine, and the slope up the slope in some sections somewhat steep.  We had to be extra careful because of the injured elbows.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThese are views from the top of Inferno Cone.  The objects in the distance in the picture below are called spatter cones.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAYou can see Big Southern Butte (that lies to the east) in the picture below.  It is supposed to be one of the largest volcanic domes on earth.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe got a 360º panoramic view from this vantage point.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere are flowering plants that survive in these harsh conditions.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe drove to the area of the spatter cones.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is what it looks like inside one of them. Notice the interesting color of the rocks towards the bottom of the picture.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAHere  are some more of the hardy plants in this area.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is a picture of Inferno Cone from a distance.  There is a person walking down the hill.  You can make the person out more clearly in the second picture below.  I also want to highlight the fact that the National Park Service has used material in the building of the pavements in the park that match the dark volcanic rock in their color.  I thought this was a nice touch.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERASome of the larger vegetation that we saw reflected the harsh nature of our surroundings, and made for beautiful and dramatic views when set against the open sky.  The wind does seem to shape the trees.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe following pictures were taken from the Broken Top Loop Trail.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAYou can take a detour from the Broken Top Loop Trail to the Big Sink Overlook to see another area of lava flow in the park.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe stopped at the Buffalo Caves at the tail end of our hike on the Broken Top Loop Trail.  You can see one of the openings to the caves in the pictures below.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe presence of caves that you can enter is not very obvious from ground level. There were a couple of adventurous young ladies who were exploring underground, and they popped their heads out unexpectedly!  They encouraged me to go in, saying that it was quite safe.  One of them showed me the way.  I had to crawl in through the shallow entrance.  I was fortunate that I did not hurt myself when I bumped my head.  (The rock was light and crumbly.  So I was left with small pieces of rock in my hair.)  I believe that you are supposed to wear a helmet.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOnce inside the cave, it expanded into a large space where you can walk standing up.  One gets out of the cave from a different spot, at the other end of the space that we were standing over.  Interesting experience!  There are other caves to explore at the Craters of the Moon National Monument.

We left the park shortly after the hike on the Broken Top Loop Trail and started the drive towards Bellevue, the place we were staying at that night.  It was a bit of an adventure since I had not done my research about the town of Bellevue, and about the driving distances involved in the drive, properly. The GPS function on the smartphone that we were using for navigation stopped working properly somewhere along the way.  Fortunately, we were able to reset the device just in time to be able to find the turnoff from the road that we were on onto a secondary road towards Bellevue. Once on this road I began to get even more nervous, because we seemed to be in the middle of the countryside, and the GPS device indicated that Bellevue was close by, much closer than I expected.  I was cursing myself for not having done my homework properly.  We were going to be lost in the middle of Idaho!  Fortunately, we hit a main road at the outskirts of the town itself before too long, and it was clear that we were in population center with some activity, including hotels and restaurants.

We found the Silver Creek Hotel where we were staying that night easily.   It turned out to be a really nice and modern place.  Our room on one of the higher floors faced west.  We could see the end of the sunset.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADinner was at a Mexican restaurant close by that we were able to walk to.  The place was a watering hole.  They were serving relatively inexpensive mainstream beers (rather than local craft brews) in large 32 ounce mugs. Neither of us indulged to that extent!

We walked back to our hotel rather full. The Chinese restaurant next door to the place we had eaten at had an empty feel to it.  There were some young people hanging out, but mostly the place was quiet.  It felt like a small town.

The plan for the next day was to drive north through the Sun Valley to the Sawtooth mountains.

The last posting in this series of blogs here.

The 2019 Road Trip: The Rest Day

Here are a few pictures taken at our cabin in Victor early in the morning after the two days of visiting Grand Teton National Park.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is the living room of the house before sunrise.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis picture is taken closer to sunrise.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI actually walked out into the cold to take the picture below. You can see the setting moon.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACommercial aircraft carrying consignments of human souls zipped across the morning sky, this one headed to some place northwest of where we were.PA150256.jpgThis was a leisurely morning.  The decision to stay put in the cabin for the day came only after everybody had woken up.  Nobody, it seems, felt a strong desired to spend another day at the Grand Teton National Park.  It did take some driving over the mountain pass to get to the place, and we had been doing this crossing regularly.  It also took some time to get to the park.  Maybe it was getting to be too much.  We also looked into local hikes closer to Victor but ended up deciding not to go out on any.  We were going to relax.

This was the day for board games and catching up on reading.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI got somewhat restless after a little while of sitting around in the cabin and decided to go for a drive on my own.  I went into the main part of town and took a few pictures there.  It looked like a typical western town.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI proceeded towards Driggs, the next big town on the main road.  It was just a few miles away.  We had stayed there the first night of the trip.

I saw a sign for Darby Canyon Road just outside of Driggs.  I made an unplanned turn onto this road on the  spur of the moment.  I had no idea what lay in store for me.

The road led to some hills in the distance.  I was headed east.   In a mile or two the paved road turned to dirt, and shortly after that it came to a T-junction.  There was a field in front of me, and an abandoned house on the road going left.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe road to the right made a 90 degree turn to the left just beyond the field, and continued east.  I decided to go in that direction.  I ended up heading into Darby Canyon.  I had not planned any of this.  So, I did not know where the road was going to lead me.  But I kept driving.  I arrived at a trail head.  The trail itself did not look well maintained at that point. It was not very tempting.PA150276.jpgThe canyon stretched out in front of me.  I had no idea how far the road went into the canyon.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt was tempting to investigate further, but, in the end, I did not drive too far down the Canyon . All of this was unplanned, and I had not budgeted time for “adventures”.   I turned back towards the main road to Driggs.

On the way back to the road, I took a picture of this massive irrigation device in a field.  We saw many instances of such equipment in the field in the huge farms that we drove by during this trip.   I am not sure exactly how this mobile sprinkler system works, since there appears to be the need for a water source at one end, and it looks like the whole system can move without being anchored at any location.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOnly later did I find out that I had actually crossed from Idaho into Wyoming when driving into Darby canyon.  In fact, a short stretch of the road that I had driven along before turning into the canyon ran along the border.

Driggs was a short distance away once I reached the main road.   It is a small town.  There did not seem to be any significant tourist related activities, but I did  see signs for a national forest and an outdoor store.  There is a winter sports area close by called the Grand Targhee Resort.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAFrom the establishments on the main street, I gathered that there was a Buddhist presence in town.  I picked up lunch for the folks in Victor from this small establishment which had prayer scrolls hung up all around on the inside. This was a hole in the wall.  I was served by two kids, one of them Asian, perhaps Thai.  There was no place to sit inside, and I took one of the last two bags of potato chips.  There was one apple left.  (This place does not even have its own website.)OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI headed back to Victor after picking up lunch.

My eyes were drawn to something by the wayside on the way back.  I stopped for a quick look.  I had seen the signs earlier, but I had not stopped.  This time I turned off the main road.  It looked like a joke, but suspect that it is, or perhaps was, real.  I would be surprised if the drive-in theater is still functional.  There is a website for the theater that looks real, but it looks old and the links do not work.  Old Murphy looked like something out of a Disney movie.  The spud could not have been real, but I did not confirm.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt was a very short stop.

I was able to take a picture of the front of the cabin we were staying at when I returned to Victor.  It felt bigger inside than it looked like from outside.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERALunch was a little delayed due to my unplanned detour.  The rest of the afternoon passed by quickly.  I  made sure I got a group picture before we left for Jackson Hole Airport to drop off the folks headed for Massachusetts.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe drive to the airport was uneventful.    We could have driven through the park to the airport and made another attempt to see the moose, but we had left the park pass in the cabin.  This was the last crossing of Teton Pass for some of us.

I took this picture of the cowboy on the bucking horse at the entrance to the airport.  This is a symbol of the State of Wyoming.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe three of us drove back to Victor.  It was going to be our last night there.  We had dinner at a small Thai restaurant called Chiang Mai Thai Kitchen, a surprising find in a place like Victor.  (Perhaps the existence of the restaurant was connected with the presence of Buddhists in the general area.)  The food was good, but the dishes were different from what one is used to seeing in more mainstream Thai restaurants in the US.  We enjoyed the food with some local beer.

And that was it for the day.  I did take pictures of the moon again – for the last time in Victor.  It was obvious that the moon was waning.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERANext in this series of blogs here.

The 2019 Road Trip: Grand Teton National Park – Day 2

Once again, I made sure to be up early in the morning to see the sunrise.  I stepped outside from the bedroom into the cold morning in my night clothes to get the pictures.  Thankfully, it was not as cold as it had been during the first few nights of this trip.   The two pictures below were taken as time progressed as it got closer to sunrise.  Sunrise that day was not as colorful as it had been the previous morning.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAPA140945.jpgI went to the other side of the house to take pictures of the moon. These came out better than the pictures I had taken before going to bed.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAHere is the moon setting behind a hill.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAs it became brighter outside, there was enough light to see the horses out in the field next to us.  We saw these three horses together regularly.  I imagined them as a family.  I jokingly said that one of them was named Jack.  I did not take the trouble to identify which one of them was actually Jack.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIn a little while, the sun itself finally made its grand appearance.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERABreakfast was once again a leisurely affair before we set out to the park.

I was able to take  pictures since I was not driving.   The picture below was taken as we were nearing Teton Resort.  Once again, we went into the park through the south entrance, without passing through Jackson, hoping that the moose were still hanging out where they had been sighted the previous day.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis was a view of the mountains to the west as we drove into the park.  Our first stop was going to be Signal Mountain, towards the north side of the park.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe drove slowly through the section of the earlier moose sighting without any luck.

We saw bikers once again after entering the more developed section of the park.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is a picture of Grand Teton mountain taken from the car.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis picture was taken from one of the parking lots along the park road.  I think it was Potholes Turnout.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe had to drive up a winding road to get to the viewpoints on Signal Hill.   The road ended at the top of the mountain at the location of a cellphone tower.

This was the view of Jackson Hole Valley with the Snake river flowing through it.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis bird stayed around us while we were at the lookout at the peak.  I have not been able to identify it.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThese are views in the direction of the Tetons.  Unfortunately, they were not as unobstructed as I was hoping for.  I jokingly noted that they should be cutting some of the trees that block the view – just for the tourists!OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe sighted what I think were mule deer on our way down the mountain.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis picture was taken half way down Signal Mountain.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe stopped at the Chapel of the Sacred Heart on our way further north after leaving Signal Mountain. The chapel was closed for the season.  It belongs to the Catholic parish in Jackson.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is Jackson Lake and reservoir.  The Snake river flows south through the lake.  The river actually begins a short distance to the north of the lake and flows through it.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is where the Snake river reemerges from Jackson lake.  The main road runs over the dam that creates the lake behind it.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe drove off the main road to a river access point to have our lunch.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe Snake river looked quite peaceful and the waters were low.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe water was crystal clear.PA140082.jpgI spotted a common merganser in the river.  It did not hang around too long.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAfter lunch, we headed out to the Willows Flats overlook. We were going hike the Willow Falls Trail starting at the parking lot.  Our goal for the afternoon was to see moose.  We had been told that this was one of the areas where they hung out!

The trail lay below the parking lot, behind the trees (towards the front of the picture below).OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe Tetons were visible in the distance, beyond Jackson Lake, as we began the hike.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe kept our eyes peeled, looking for moose (and bear).  There were a few occasions when our eyes were drawn to something or the other in the distance that drew our attention.  Even the growth seen in the picture below caused us to pause and look more carefully.  (I had to zoom in to the maximum extent allowed by the lens to get this picture.)OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe trail followed the twin tracks of a an old dirt road.  We forded a stream at this point.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe flats were covered with brush.  We could see occasional pathways where animals had forced their way through the growth to get to drinking holes by the waterside.  The occasional scat on the trail indicated that this was the abode of the animals and that they were around somewhere.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe continued to look for moose.  We were also keeping an eye out for bear.  I did not want to disturb a bear inadvertently and annoy it.  We tried to keep up a conversation to alert the bear ahead of our arrival.   I was especially alert when walking in the wooded areas between the open spaces.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe crossed Pilgrim Creek on a road bridge at one point.  The creek looked wide and impressive enough to be a river.  It runs from the nearby Bridger Teton National Forest into Jackson Lake.PA140129.jpgWe saw these two birds along the way.  I have not been able to identify them yet.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe trail ended up at a fork in the road where you could continue either leftOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA or right.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe made a different decision! We decided that this would be the extent of the hike.  We turned back.  We had already walked a few miles without seeing moose!OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThese pictures were taken on the way back.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe did see a herd of elk in the distance as we were leaving the place.  I am sorry to say that the moose eluded us the entire duration of the hike.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt was time now to head back to Victor.  We would be driving south, all the way through the park, on our way back to Idaho.

Along the way, we stopped at one of the turnoffs and noted this curious sight.  The woman was facing the direction of the Tetons.  It took us a few minutes to gather that she was actually taking a picture of a car that was in the parking lot in front of her.  She was taking the picture against the background of the mountains.  A person who looked like the driver was also hanging out in the parking lot.  Our guess was that this was for some kind of advertisement.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe sun was going down behind the mountains by that time.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe did have enough time to stop at the Chapel of the Transfiguration – in the park and near Moose Junction.  It is a functional Episcopalian church that was built in 1925. The setting of the chapel is very dramatic.  (A morning view of the chapel against the mountains would have been even more impressive!)OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe interior of the chapel is very simple. The opening behind the altar revealed the Grand Tetons.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe benches that formed the pews reflected simplicity, and the nature of their surroundings.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe continued our way south through the park even though it might have been faster to drive on the main road through Jackson.  We stopped at the parking lot of the earlier moose sighting once again.  We had no luck once again.  I did get a picture of what I suspect is a Goldeneye duck in the water.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe mountains looked majestic in the fading light as we left the park.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe stopped at a place called West Side Yard in Victor for dinner.  It was more of a bar, with a lot of open space, space for games, and random sitting arrangements. The separate, very small, formal dining area was full when we arrived.   So we sat at a high table on high chairs near the bar and ordered our beer and hot sandwiches.  It was great food and drink, and a nice atmosphere.  The place looked new.  The draft beer came from some of the local microbreweries.  (There is even one in Victor.) I sensed that this place represented a kind of change coming to these old country towns, with a goal of serving people who were visiting the area in addition to the local population.  Victor was not a tourist destination in itself, but there was enough overflow traffic from the nearby more touristy areas to bring in additional foot traffic to keep a business going.

We headed back to the cabin after dinner.  The rest of the evening was spent chilling out.   This was the last evening of the holiday for the folks from Massachusetts.  Their were taking a red-eye flight in the evening the next day.

Next blog in this series here.

The 2019 Road Trip: Grand Teton National Park – Day 1

I have a habit of waking up early in the morning when traveling.  It might be a certain restlessness that comes with being in a new place, and a need for me to explore and find out more about the new surroundings.

Thus it was this first morning at our log cabin in Victor, Idaho.  This was the view outside the window of the bedroom we were occupying when I woke up.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERALater in the morning, from the front of the house, we could see the neighborhood where our cabin was located.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe morning light streamed into the dining room area of our house through the giant windows as we had our morning coffee,OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAwhile a little, stout, bird warmed itself in the sunlight on top of an evergreen tree in front of us.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe rising sun revealed open fields behind the house.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAfter a leisurely breakfast, we headed towards Grand Teton National Park, crossing the Teton Pass once again, this time on the way east.  After descending into the valley on the Wyoming side of the mountain range, we turned onto the road to take us into the park.  This turnoff was well before the town of Jackson.

We passed the resort area of Teton Village before we reached the entrance to the park.  The ski slopes behind the resort were bare.  The traffic around the area was light.  I am sure the place is busier during the winter season when the ski slopes are covered with snow.  The entrance to the park itself was a small, unmanned, affair, and the road beyond it narrow and winding, with a section that was still unpaved.  It was apparent that this was a less developed section of the park.

After a short while of driving in the park, we arrived at a section of the road where temporary road signs indicated that vehicles were not allowed to stop by the roadside.  Beside the road were either woods or an open low-lying area.  A stream meandered through the flatland.  Reeds and shrubs, and the occasional tree, dotted this space.  All of a sudden we began to see vehicles stopped on the roadway, blocking it partially (because of the lack of space beside the road), and people getting out of their vehicles.  We were curious, but we were also inclined to follow the park rules.  We made our way (with some difficulty and a feeling of annoyance) past the stopped vehicles.  As we were leaving the area of the cars, there was a shout from the back seat that a couple of moose had been sighted!  We were really excited because one of the objectives of this trip was to see a moose.  Unfortunately, I was still driving and did not see the animal, and there was also no place to stop.  A short while after that we arrived in an opening with a big parking lot.  I was able to pull in.

We got out and started looking for moose.  Below the parking lot was a creek, with woods on the other side. There were ducks in the water, but there was no moose to be seen.  We had to leave the place without a moose sighting (for some of us), but we were resolved to come back to look for moose once again later in the trip.

The road now entered a more open area of the park.  You could see the Tetons off in the distance to the left.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOur next stop was the park headquarters at Moose Junction.  At this point we ended our drive on the narrow road that we had been on, and entered a more developed section of the park.

We watched a video about the park at the visitor center.  At the end of the movie the curtains opened up behind the screen to reveal the Tetons.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe then drove further north into the park.  We were now on a stretch of road that was wider and more suitable for the more significant tourist traffic.  We had come to the park at a time of year when the traffic was dying out due to the colder weather, as is obvious by the looks of the empty parking lot in the picture below.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAA bike trail ran beside the road, leading me to imagine some future adventure on a different set of wheels.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOur lunch stop was in a parking area near the Lupine Meadows trailhead.  We were constantly on the lookout for moose, but none obliged!IMG_20191013_133816804_HDRWe drove further north through the park.  It was past noon by now, and the position of the sun had shift further west.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe arrived at the parking lot for the String Lake trail.  Our plan was to hike to Inspiration Point, overlooking Jenny Lake.

This picture was taken as we were starting the hike.  The first part of our hike would take us from the parking lot for String Lake towards Jenny Lake.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe crossed String Lake early on.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is where an inlet from String Lake feeds into Jenny Lake.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe colors of Fall were in full display beside the trail along Jenny Lake.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere is a boat that takes tourists across Jenny lake. We had to leave the trail beside the lake and start a climb up a different trail towards Inspiration Point just beyond the place where this boat docks.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe passed Hidden Falls on our way up the hill.  There were short stretches of snow and ice on this section of the trail, at places where the sun does not reach that easily this time of year.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe reached Inspiration Point after a short climb in an open section of the trail higher up the mountain.  This was the view of Jenny Lake for Inspiration Point.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOnce we left Inspiration Point, we continued to climb towards Cascade Canyon Trail. We turned right at the intersection with Cascade Canyon Trail in order to head back to Jenny Lake, and to the parking lot where we had left our car.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACascade Canyon Trail in the other direction actually goes between mountain peaks to a point where you can catch the Teton Crest Trail and get closer to Grand Teton mountain, the highest peak in the range.  A hike in that direction had to be left as a possible adventure for another day.

We headed back towards Jenny Lake.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe sun was setting behind the mountains as we arrived back at Jenny Lake.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAs we were leaving the area of the lake, I noticed these markings on the side of a tree. From what I had read that morning at the visitor center, these were most likely the markings of the paw of a bear.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThroughout our stay in the park, we were warned about how to handle encounters with bears.  We were on the lookout for them constantly, but did not see any in the end.  They do recommend carrying bear spray to deter the animals.  The spray contains an extract from cayenne pepper.  Apparently, it is quite potent, and something you do not want to get in your eyes.

This picture was taken as we were crossing String Lake to get back to the car.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe sun was setting as we started our drive out of the park.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOn the way out, we came upon a herd of pronghorn deer in the fields a short distance away from the road.  This is the first time I was seeing pronghorn.  We stopped by the roadside for a few minutes so that I could take pictures.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAPA130921.jpgAs we were leaving the park, we could see the mountains of the Gros Ventre range on the eastern side of Jackson Hole valley lit up in the fading light of the setting sun.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADinner was at a place called Liberty Burger in Jackson.  Some of us tried out bison burgers.  Then it was back over the Teton Pass, and onward to Victor, Idaho, for the night.

Later in the evening, back at the cabin, I tried to take more pictures of the moon.  It was the day after a full moon.  For some reason, just as it happened the previous night, I was still not getting a clear picture with the camera. It was a strange image, as if some diffused light from around the moon was falling on the lens of the camera through the night sky. Weird!OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe did not stay up too late that evening.  We were tired after the day’s activities.

Next blog in this series here.

The 2019 Road Trip: Yellowstone – Day 2

It was another cold morning in Park Spring, Idaho, but not as bad as the previous one.  OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe had to depart the cabin that we had been staying in for two nights and move on to the next destination.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe eyes on the deer seemed to be following me through the house as we prepared to leave.  I could not make out any particular expression.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI turned over the driving responsibility for the day to Jesse.  This allowed me to better see what was going on all around us as we drove to the park.   Here you can see one of the big ranches that we passed.  There was a lot of cattle and horses out there.  We were wondering how the animals survive out in the sub-freezing temperatures of the night.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe passed through West Yellowstone for the last time.  A search in the town for Yaktrax, cleats that you put over your shoes to let you walk more easily on snow and ice, was unsuccessful.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe had forgotten to take our obligatory National Park picture at the entrance of Yellowstone earlier during our visit.  We took the pictures that morning.  In case you are wondering, the other side of this sign welcomes you to the park.  We chose to take the picture from this direction because of the direction of the sunlight.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe fly fishermen were out in the rivers early in the morning.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe first stop within the park was roadside at Beryl Spring.

Steam rose from below the boardwalk as we walked from the parking lot.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAFumes filled the air from the fumaroles.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERABeryl Spring is supposed to be the hottest spring within the park, with temperatures close to boiling.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe combination of the steam with the below freezing air temperature made for interesting formations.  We were thinking that some of these scenes would have been suitable for Christmas cards.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe ice crystals formed delicate patterns on the leaves.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe next stop was Artists Paintpots.  We had to walk a little bit to get to the terrace where the underground activity was obvious.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAYou can climb a hill behind the terrace from which you get a view of the activity below youOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAand also some of the venting activity on the hillside.

The small holes in the ground in the pictures below allow gases and steam under pressure to escape from below.  The symmetry of the hole below was interesting to see,OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAand also the manner in which the deposits can grow with time.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWater bubbled out of the mud pots.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe could see both levels of the trail as we walked back to the parking lot.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe next stop was the Norris Geyser Basin.  The trails were a little tricky in this location because of snow and ice.  Some of us walked to one of the terraces.  We followed a small loop in the back basin.

This area has the tallest geyser in the world, Steamboat geyser.  Here it is before it eruptsOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAand here is an eruption in progress.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe sound that emanates from the Vixen geyser below, and its appearance, is quite unique and notable.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere were many geysers and hot springs of different kinds in this area.  Apparently, they are caused by the faults running below the ground in this particular section of the park. These faults allow moisture to seep into the ground through the cracks, and through the crust, into the thin mantle of the earth and close to the magma bubble beneath.  What is interesting is that every geyser has its own personality and character.  It could be in the size, the timing, in the noise that it generates, the nature of output – clear water spray vs. the spraying of drops, the pattern of eruption, etc.  And all of these characteristics change with time as the dynamic underground forces impact the crust above it.  Unfortunately, some of the changes are due to the humans who have been visiting Yellowstone.  One of the geysers closed due to visitors throwing rocks into the vent for their own amusement.  It is a disappointment that we humans indulge in this kind of destructive behavior even today, and not just in the context of taking care of the nature around us.

This is a general picture of the activity going on in the back basin.  In the background, on the hill in the midst of the trees, is steam rising from some kind of geological activity in the ground.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe area in front of us in the picture below is called the Porcelain basin.  There is a trail that runs through it.  We had no time to explore further.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is a picture of the venting in the Porcelain basin.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt was tricky walking back to the car in the snow and ice.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOur next stop was at Canyon Village.  They had an interesting museum with a focus on the geological history of Yellowstone.  There are very few places in the world where the forces inside the earth are close enough to the surface to be revealed to us.  Iceland and Hawaii are two other such regions.

We took a drive to Inspiration Point on the north rim of the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe then went to Artist Point on the south rim of the canyon.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThese are views of the Yellowstone river and the lower falls from Artist Point.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe walked from another parking lot on the south rim to get a closer view of the upper falls.  The view might have been more impressive from the North Rim, but the parking lot there was closed.PA120619.jpgThis was going to be our last day at Yellowstone.  We began our drive south towards Jackson and the Grand Tetons.

On the way, while still in Yellowstone, we stopped to see Sulphur Caldron, considered the most acidic hot spring in Yellowstone.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere was a newly formed vent in the parking lot.  It was cordoned off.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOur final stop in the park was at the location called Mud Volcano.  We had to walk a trail up a hill to get to the location of the activity.  This area was interesting because of all the “mud” activity.  The picture below was a scene next to the parking lot.  I believe it is called the Mud Caldron.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Here is a bubbling mud spring half way up Cooking Hillside, with mud flowing out of it all the way to the bottom of the hill.  I think it is called Sizzling Basin. There are bubbles constantly coming out of the muddy surface, like the surface of a sizzling pan.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is Churning Caldron.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is Black Dragon Caldron.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is Mud Volcano.  It stopped erupting a long time ago.  It is now just a hot spring.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADragons Mouth Spring.PA120693.jpgAs we drove south, we came upon a section where a single coyote was hunting for food in the grass beside the trail.  We stopped for a little while to take in the action.PA120697.jpgOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe sun was setting as we left the park.   It was a pretty sunset over the lake with the Tetons in the distance to our right.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe sun set behind the Tetons a short while later.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere was a full moon out.  I tried to get a picture of the moon but did not do too well.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe stopped at Jackson for dinner.  We went to  Pica’s Mexican Taqueria in a Hispanic side of town.  It was a small place serving the locals with authentic food.  They had some canned local beers that satisfied my thirst.  A huge heaping of fajita vegetables and chicken satisfied my hunger.

Then it was on to the town of Victor for the night, crossing the Teton Pass into Idaho once again.  This was something that we did several times during the trip.

It was not difficult to find the cabin that we were going to stay in that night.  We were very happy to find a spacious place with all the modern amenities, and best of all, two full bathrooms!

The house seemed to be located on a plain in the middle of nowhere.  We got a better idea of our surroundings the next morning.  I took a few pictures of the clear sky before we went to bed.  I still need to develop my skills when it comes to taking nighttime shots.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAnd that was it for the long day!

Next in this series of blogs here.

The 2019 Road Trip: Yellowstone – Day 1

It was very, very, cold the the next morning. According to the weather app, the local temperature was about -3° F outside when we woke up.  Fortunately, we did not have to go out immediately.  A breakfast of cooked oats and hot coffee warmed us up for the outdoors.  I made sure to start the car up early to try to warm it up for others.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOur first stop  was the West Yellowstone airport. Our rental car company had a counter there where we could register another driver for the car.  The airport itself was quite tiny, and it was about to close for the winter.

Traffic in the town of West Yellowstone was light as we drove through.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAfter entering the park we drove for a while by the Madison river.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAt a place called Madison, we took the road going north towards our first destination of the day – Mammoth Hot Springs.  The other option would have been to take the road south towards Old Faithful.  Our plan was to head to Old Faithful later in the day.

During our drives, there were sometimes places where steam rose from close to, or even  underneath, the roadway.  There were parking lots  to pull into to take in the sights.  This particular place where we stopped was called Terrace Spring.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAYou can see the steam and hot water bubbling out of the ground in the picture below.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWhen you stop at places like this, you usually walk on boardwalks that have been put in place.  This protects you from the unstable ground under.

The recent snowfall made things a little tricky on this boardwalk. In order to prevent contamination, the park avoids the use of salt and other chemicals to melt snow and ice from their boardwalks and roads.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe stopped for pictures at Gibbon Falls on the Gibbon river.  The parking lot for this view was just beside the road.  The Gibbon flows into the Madison river.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe meadows were covered with a light layer of snow.  We saw bison close by in one of these meadows.  I took pictures with my zoom lens.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe drove through the Golden Gate Canyon that connects Mammoth Hot Springs to the the rest of the park.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe stopped at the parking lot for the Mammoth Hot Springs Terraces.  It was time for lunch.  Our sandwiches were made with peanut butter and banana, a combination that, along with the steel cut oats that we had eaten in the morning, created a lot of extra activity on my digestive system.  It was good to be able to walk it off in the open air.

From the area of the hot springs, one could see Fort Yellowstone below us.  A visitor center and park headquarters is located there today.   OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA It was possible to take a trail from where we were to the fort.  Instead, we decided to walk on the Upper Terrace Loop Drive.  The road was closed to motorized traffic, probably because of road conditions in certain sections.PA110201.jpgThis is one of the formations we came upon during the walk.  It is called the Orange Spring Mound.  It was formed over many years by the deposition of the minerals from  the water (steam) emanating from the earth. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is called the White Elephant Back Terrace.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe area below is called Angel Terrace.  You can see the interaction of the hot water with the fresh snow.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe drove down to Fort Yellowstone.  The visitor center at Fort Yellowstone proved to be one of the smaller ones in the park.

We stopped to look at some of the activity on the lower terrace of Mammoth Spring on our way back from Fort Yellowstone.PA110232.jpgThen it was on to Old Faithful.

During our drives we saw people fly fishing in many of the rivers and creeks.  The folks would be right out there in the middle of the water flow in their waterproof waders.  They did not seem to be feeling the cold.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe headed straight for the geyser after getting to the parking lot at the Visitor Center for Old Faithful.  It was fortunate that we did this because the geyser put up a show and erupted within a few minutes of our arrival.  It was perfect timing.

It all looked benign when the activity started.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe geyser built up steam slowly.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt peaked.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAnd then the wind began to carry the steam high into the sky!OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe activity was over within a few minutes.  Old Faithful erupts about once every hour and a half these day.   It used to erupt once an hour in the past.

A stop at the Visitor Center allowed us to catch one of the videos that they have about a park.  We make it a point to try to see these videos whichever national park we happen to be in.

It was time to start making our way back to Park Island.

We ended up making two stops along the way. One was at the Black Sand Basin. It was going to be a quick drive by, but I was intrigued enough by what I saw that we spent a little more time.

This picture shows the different colored minerals that are being deposited on the rocks from the hot water and steam coming out of the earth.  The colors are muted in the picture below because the sun was  setting behind a mountain at this point when I took the picture. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe following pictures were taken on the Fountain Paint Pot trail further along the drive back to Park Island.  We walked along a boardwalk.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere was a section of the boardwalk here that was so slippery that only two of us followed the loop to its end to get back to the car.  Others retraced their paths in order to get back.

The Paint Pot walk was the last stop for us within the park that day.  In general, there were many more locations where one could have stopped to experience the wonderland that is Yellowstone National Park.

On the way back, we stopped in West Yellowstone once again for dinner.  The place we ate at was called Beartooth Barbecue.  The food was good, and the place was crowded.  They told us that they were about to shut down operations for the winter.

Back in our log cabin in Park Island, we were hoping that the heating issues would have been addressed.  Unfortunately, that was not the case.  Fortunately, the temperatures had risen a little bit – but it was still below freezing in the night.

I cannot remember much more of what happened that evening.  This was going to be our last night in Park Island.  We were going to drive through Yellowstone towards the Grand Tetons the next day.

The next blog in this series here.