When God Spilled His Coffee

It a was a windy morning in Destin, Florida, and God was quite cranky.  The citizens had been partying too much last night, and it had taken all his efforts to keep things in order.  Besides, this was one of those nights he felt like it would have been nice to take a nap.  Even God needed a break!

But there were things that needed to get done.  Those humans were incapable of taking care of themselves.  Where is my coffee, he roared! (You know, God always roars when he is in a bad mood!)

The angels were afraid to respond, but there was one who was concerned about the bad things the would happen if God did not have his coffee.  Angel Norah knew that if she did not do something there would be a storm that would destroy everything in the town of Destin, even its wonderful white beaches.  There would be thunder and rain, and a wind that would shake the very ground that the trees and buildings stood on.  The citizens of Destin could be in for a boatload of trouble.

The Angel Norah rose to the occasion.  She knew that decaf would not be good enough this morning.  (And God also loved his cream and sugar!)  And the coffee had to be fresh.   The decoction coffee from the previous evening would not do.  She found the percolator, and some fair-trade coffee from the Congo, the best coffee there was!  An extra spoon of coffee powder went into the machine and, also, a special filter that was supposed to have magical qualities.

The coffee brewed while God tried to shake the cobwebs away, grumbling to himself all the while. Those crazy humans.  He wished he had never created them.  They had been nothing but trouble so far!

The coffee was ready, finally!  Angel Norah looked for a cup to pour it into.  It had to be big enough for God.  She felt that he needed a lot of caffeine that morning.   The coffee cup with the picture of the tasmanian devil was the biggest one around, but Angel Norah did not wish to get God even angrier.  After all, he hated the devil in all its forms.  So, she settled for the cup that said “Have a nice day”, hoping that it would put God in a better mood.

The coffee was poured.  Some skim milk was added.  (Whole milk was out of the question. God had to watch his weight!)  Angel Norah looked for the brown sugar.  She could not find it.  She would have to settle for the regular refined kind.  But even that was hard to find. Darn, she said!  (Angels have to be careful about using swear words, you see.)  There was only Splenda around.  That would have to do.

God was still mumbling to himself when Angel Norah brought his coffee to him.  Her hands shaking, she handed a full cup.  God took a sip from the steaming cup.  He had been looking forward to this.  A strange look came upon his face.   It began to turn to purple.  Sparks began to fly from his beard.  Lightning shot into the sky from his hair.  I fear the Splenda was not to his liking.

He turned his head and spit the coffee into the Gulf.  He threw the rest of the coffee into the water.  The pelicans flew out of the way of the falling coffee.  The waters of the Gulf of Mexico turned to brown.  The waves rose angrily and raced towards the shore, and washed the brown water on to the beaches of Destin.  And the white sand turned to brown! And people who were walking on the beach (those that had not partied the previous night and caused all these problems) wondered what was going on on.

But, you and I know that this is what happens when you make God angry and  he spills his coffee!OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

The Sun Sets Upside Down In The Morning

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I woke up early today.  I had been planning to drive to Forest Park for an early morning run. I peered out between the blinds of the 7th floor apartment and noticed that the sun was beginning to rise on the other side of the Mississippi.  I reached for my camera.  Little did I realize that I would be looking at the sun temporarily setting upside down between the clouds!

The Tree (4/16/2005)

The old treeThe tree had seen many seasons pass by.  Its days as a young sapling were barely a memory. It had lived through many times of change, and survived many years, to grow into a fully formed master of the jungle, multi-branched and majestic in its span, held up by a strong and solid trunk, and fed by its well-spread and efficient roots that picked up nourishment from Mother Earth.

As a young plant growing up the thick woods, there was an element of uncertainty about its ability to survive. There were times when there was a doubt whether it would make it through the season, or even through the day. In those days, it did not have the strength and the knowledge to endure on its own. It was dependent on the creatures that lived around it, it was dependent on the earth and the skies – it was even dependent on the winds that blew through its young and growing branches.

But now it was a mature and strong ruler of its domain. It had seen many things, and gone through many experiences, both good and bad. It had become a wise one. (Of course, it had not traveled far and wide. It was a tree, for heavens sake!) It had known troubles and setbacks, and survived to fight another day. It had seen change, both in itself and in the things around it. It had known both happiness and sadness. It had experienced the beauty of the sunrise and the sunset, it had withstood many a storm that shook its trunk and threatened the very core of its existence. When one of its branches suffered, perhaps from a bolt of lightning, or perhaps from an illness in its leaves, the tree found a way to survive. It could thank its strong roots and its other healthy branches that worked to keep it alive – each branch vibrant with the new leaves of spring, the flowers of summer, the multicolored hues of fall, and the whites of winter. The birds resting on its generous branches, singing happy songs, gave it pleasure. It had learned that the dark and gloomy winter that left it cold and shivering, would eventually be replaced by the rebirth in Spring. It knew that if trouble came to pass, it could survive because it had survived similar troubles in the past. Nothing could bother it. And it wished to be sure that its wisdom was passed along to the young ones.

It wanted to make sure that these young ones, the seeds that grew into saplings, and the saplings that grew into stronger plants, and then into trees, would know how to face the world, and also learn to recognize the gifts provided by the earth. It wished to show them the safe path amidst the dangers that lurked, and it also wished to help them experience all the good things that it had itself experienced. It knew that it had to be patient in its endeavors, and that it would not always be successful. It also knew that there would be a time when it could teach no more. It watched over the seed that had fallen far away, and hoped that it would still be able to learn in spite of its distance – that it would still listen, that it would realize that nothing survives in this world on its own.

It knew that its time would eventually pass, and that its roots would not be able to sustain it forever, but this bothered it little. It had survived to see what it wanted to see, and experience what it wanted to experience, and it had left its legacy behind in the trees and plants that had risen from its seed. It had helped many a creature of the woods, whether it was one that needed protection, or even some food, or whether it was one that just needed a comfortable trunk to rub itself against to remove the itch from its back. It had served its purpose and had left its mark on this earth! It did not matter if it happened to be cut down the next day. It did not matter if a flood washed it away along with its roots during the next thunderstorm. It was content.