Return to Ohiopyle, Pennsylvania

The last time I came to Ohiopyle was in 2016, during the epic KVIITM75 bike ride from Pittsburgh to the Washington DC area.  We had arrived at Ohiopyle on the second day of the ride, just in time for a late lunch stop and a detour to visit Fallingwater, the famous Frank Lloyd Wright built home.  We had arrived in town with little time to spare, and somewhat tired from the ride from Perryopolis earlier in the day.  We had picked up lunch from a restaurant near the place where we were to catch the shuttle to Fallingwater, and had decided to ride our bikes to the Ohiopyle waterfall to consume the food.  Alas, we never found the waterfall, having misunderstood directions provided to us, and having taken a path into the woods instead of into town.

But I was determined to return to Ohiopyle some day, not necessarily to look for the waterfall, but to explore the beautiful state park nearby.  The attraction of Fallingwater was actually what eventually led us to make the trip back to Ohiopyle last week.  We entered the town on a road that actually went past a busy part of town (nowhere near the trail we had biked on), and there on our left, beside the parking lot, were the waterfalls!  We spent some time walking through town before and after lunch.  Here are some pictures.

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Ohiopyle Waterfall on the Youghioheny river
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Ohiopyle Waterfall
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The Great Allegheny Passage (GAP) bike trail bridge in the distance
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Walking through town
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The GAP bridge over the Youghiogheny
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View of bridge from town

The B&O and the Western Maryland railroad lines used to run through Ohiopyle on the two sides of the Youghiogheny river.  The Western Maryland line has been converted to the Great Allegheny Passage.  The old B&O line is now a CSX mainline connecting the eastern seaboard to the rest of the country.  Ohiopyle is now a holiday spot with a focus on watersports and place for bike riders on the GAP to rest.  The Ohiopyle State Park is on the other side of the bridge!

The Flooding at the Monocacy Aqueduct

These pictures were taken during one of our Sunday walks towards the end of May.  The aqueduct carries the C&O canal across the Monocacy river.

This kind of flooding happens every once in a while, and most often during the spring season when we get a lot of rain.  The accumulation of the debris is somewhat unusual.  The last time it happened they had to bring in heavy equipment to remove the tree branches that were caught on the structure of the aqueduct and putting pressure on it.

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Upstream side of the aqueduct
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Downstream of the aqueduct
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Debris stuck at the aqueduct, including significant amounts of trash
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The extent of the flooding

The following picture was taken during the same walk at a different location on the trail.  This is upstream on the Potomac river.

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Noland Ferry

Dandelion Tales

Spring is the time of year for the dandelions to emerge and go through their visible annual life-cycle in our part of the world.  I like dandelions even though they are considered a nuisance and battled in the lawns of our homes.

Dandelions tend to take over other untreated open spaces once they find a foothold.  You can experience the life cycle of the dandelions while walking along the towpath.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

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New
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Mature
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After the flower and before the seed head emerges
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Wet seed head
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Drying out
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Almost Gone

Dandelions are supposed to be edible, including the flowers, leaves and roots.

Cleaning up the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

A socially active friend of mine had told me about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch a while back.  He is the type of person who is likely to latch on to out-of-the-mainstream causes, some of which require a lot of work to verify.  I only followed the story in the background of my mind for several years, not certain if there was any exaggeration in the statement of the problem.  The subject seems to have moved into the mainstream in more recent times.

We human beings do not realize the extent of the damage that we are doing to the planet just because we do not see a lot of it with our own eyes. We will also willingly deny the role that we play in the process of its destruction.

What is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch?  From Wikipedia:
“The patch is characterized by exceptionally high relative pelagic concentrations of plastic, chemical sludge, and other debris that have been trapped by the currents of the North Pacific Gyre.  Its low density (4 particles per cubic meter) prevents detection by satellite imagery, or even by casual boaters or divers in the area. It consists primarily of an increase in suspended, often microscopic, particles in the upper water column.”

How big is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch?  From Wikipedia:
“The findings from the two expeditions, show that the patch is 1.6 million square kilometers and has a concentration of 10-100 kg per square kilometers. They estimate there to be 80.000 metric tonnes in the patch, with 1.8 trillion plastic pieces, out of which 92% of the mass is to be found in objects larger than 0.5 centimeters.”

The reason for my posting of this blog was a mainstream news item that I saw on CNN regarding attempts to try to address the issue.  The project is called The Ocean Cleanup.  They think they are capable of cleaning up 50% of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in five years.  Part of the solution is trying to figure how the best way to recycle the garbage that is captured. Hope it all works, and that we can clean up the mess that we have all made!

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Twisted stuff

Sometimes you need to twist your head if you want to give yourself a good scratch.  Here is an egret at Black Hill Park in Montgomery County in Maryland.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis great blue heron is standing on ice while giving itself a scratch.  It must feel good!OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe twist in this egret’s neck seems a little unusual to me from this angle.  It may have to do with the position of the wings.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAHere is a bird among the twisted branches of one or more trees in winter.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe twisted branches of the trees can sure look like a mess from a distance in the woods in the early morning light.  The sun has not quite hit the level of the trail in the following picture.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe turn in the trail appears at a distance in the following picture.
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Sunrise and a Sunset in our Neighborhood

We have some spectacular sunrises and sunsets in our neighborhood when the conditions are right.  The sunrise events happen right outside our front door, and the timing is good for pictures this time of the year.  All I have to do is grab the camera and open the front door, or go to an upstairs window.  This was just a few days ago.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI can capture a decent sunset from the back of the house, but the view is partially blocked by the houses behind ours.  Capturing it in its full form requires me to go to another part of the neighborhood.   This is exactly what I did last Sunday.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA