A Different Look at Edinburgh

I have decided to present a few pictures of Edinburgh that do not include the standard tourist spots that may be more easily recognizable.  Perhaps there are others that have visited the city who have seen these sights.  I feel that experiences such as these are an essential part of enjoying the best of what the city has to offer.

I saw a “Close” for the first time in Edinburgh.  Basically these are alleyways between buildings that can lead to other places, or streets that are closed at the end. The Royal mile is full of closes, many of which take you down steps between buildings to a location on a street below it.
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Edinburgh has many gardens, including some private ones that you need a key to enter. We were able to to visit the Queen Street private garden shown below.  The second picture is from the botanical gardens.
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The history of the city and its overall architecture gives it a unique charm. The first picture is a view on Cockburn Street leading up to the Royal Mile.  The second one is taken in Greyfriars Kirkyard (Greyfriars graveyard).
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Here is a picture of the ruins of St. Anthony’s chapel in Holyrood Park.
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Here is a scene on the Water of Leith, the river that flows through Edinburgh.
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Finally, this is a picture of the tower of the Balmoral Hotel at sunset.
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I wonder if these pictures are enough to get someone to feel that Edinburgh is a place worth visiting.  If not, a collection of pictures of the more mainstream tourist destinations may be warranted!

Hushinish, Scotland

Hushinish, a little village on the Isle of Harris, was one of our destinations during the trip to the Outer Hebrides in Scotland.  We had started the morning with a big breakfast at the Garybuie B&B on the Isle of Skye and driven quickly to Uig to catch a ferry to the village of Tarbert in Harris.  Unfortunately the day had started with bad weather, and it looked like this was going to continue at our destination and through the day.  This was what it looked like at Tarbert just as we were docking.
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We were determined to continue with our adventures come what may.  We started out driving to the southern tip of Harris.    It was clear that driving through the rains would be made more of an adventure than usual because the narrow and winding roads through the stark rocky landscape were for the most part one-way affairs.  There was no place for cars to pass each other other than at the occasional passing lanes.  When two cars approached each other, the first one that got to the the passing lane waited for the other one to to get to it and pass it before proceeding.  It was a process that took some getting used to, and was easier said than done.  There were places where I had to back up, and doing that in a car with a manual gear shift that I had not used for many years made it more interesting.  If you steered incorrectly your wheels could go off the road, and in the worst case you could hit something and/or fall off the side of a hill!

We got to our destination of Rodel at the tip of Harris and visited St. Clements Church.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAfter quickly taking in the view beyond the southern tip of the Outer Hebrides (in the rain), we drove back to Tarbert using a smaller country road.  This drive was even more awesome and thrilling, with the narrow path winding between rocky outcrops and little lochs,  and through little villages by the coast.

After getting back to Tarbert, we continued on to our next stop.  In addition to the destination of the village of Hushinish at the western end of a country road going across the island, we had read that we could also visit the remains of a whaling station at Bun Abhainn Eadarra, and perhaps see some white tailed sea eagles at the North Harris Eagle Observatory.  Unfortunately none of the secondary objectives were met due to the time factor and due to the weather.

Shortly out of Tarbert we had to turn off the main road between Tarbert and Stornoway (A859) to get on to the one-lane country road  (B887) to take us to Hushinish.  This was even more of an adventure than what we had experienced before.  It took a long while to negotiate the 13 mile stretch of roadway to its terminus. The road wound its way through the rocky landscape with plenty of twists and turns and switchbacks. And it continued to rain.  There was enough tension in the passenger seat beside the driver during the ride that we had to switch riders, but I was enjoying myself!
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We passed a tennis court in the middle of nowhere during the early part of the ride.  Since Andy Murray is from Scotland, we were wondering if he had anything to do with it.  Apparently not.  We  encountered cows that refused to move from the road.  The side of the car might have actually touched a big one with a nose-ring when I attempted to get past. The cows kept going about their business. These guys seems to think that they owned the road.  Perhaps they do.  Fortunately, they are most docile.  We saw Highland cows (also called Hairy Coos by the Scots) at some point.   This was a moment of much celebration in the car since we had been on the lookout for these unique animals ever since the beginning of the ride!
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We saw people getting ready for a walk at a place that appeared to be the start of the trail to the eagle observatory. It seems that they were well prepared for the rain and were determined to get to their destination in spite of the weather. They were not to be deterred by it. (We actually saw walkers in many areas, including a couple in Hushinish itself, who had the same attitude when it came to walking.)  We passed the Amhuinnsuidhe Castle.  And then the road got worse for the last few miles.
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When we arrived at Hushinish it was pouring.  I could see the beach and about three or four houses on the other side of the beach.   There was a small parking area and one other vehicle.   We made sure we had our raincoats all zippered up before we opened the car doors.  I put a plastic bag over my camera when I stepped out.  The wind was howling.  The adults walked just a little bit, bracing themselves against the gusts of wind, while the young ones climbed  the cliff to get a view of the ocean in the distance.  (You can barely make the kids out in the top left corner of the second picture.)
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We waited beside a rock for the kids to come back.  You could see the island of Scarp in the distance.  The island was last permanently inhabited in 1971, and you can barely see the remains of the settlement in the picture below.
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The sheep watched us with amusement undeterred by the weather.
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The clothes on our lower extremities were completely wet by the time we got back to the car.  It was time to move on.

As we drove away I stopped to take this picture of the beach.  You can see the few houses that remain.
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We drove back to the main road to Stornoway and proceeded north.  Before we got to Stornoway, we stopped to see the Callanish Stones and the Dun Carloway broch.  The stones are from the neolithic age, while the broch is most likely from the first century AD.  There is indeed a lot of old history on the islands.
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The rain was beginning subside by the time we got to Stornoway.  After checking into our room we found our way to a table at the pub to conclude the evening with some fine food and drink.  We raised a toast to the end of yet another memorable day of our vacation in Scotland.

Ullapool, Scotland

I am not sure if there is anything really special about Ullapool up in the highlands of mainland Scotland, on its western coast, that that makes it more notable than other towns in the highlands.  In a sense, all of these towns and villages are notable just because of where they happen to be, and what you can do in these places.  But we did happen to spend an evening in Ullapool and came to appreciate it a little more than some of the other places that we simply drove through.

Ullapool lies at the end of the approximately two and a half hour ferry ride from Stornoway in the Outer Hebrides.  Since we were getting there on the ferry in the evening, we decided to spend the night in town before proceeding further north towards Durness.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAGetting there was an experience in itself. The ferry boat was huge and carrying a nearly full complement of vehicles and passengers, to the extent that our car was carried on an elevated floor/deck in the ship that was suspended from a roof, a floor/deck that could be retracted when not in use.  This was above the level that vehicles traveled on when the ship was not that full.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAUllapool gave the impression of being a typical village by the waters, with Lock Broom  facing it, its harbor with the fishing boats, and the waterside main street.
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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERASince we had enough time before sunset, we decided to find a hiking trail to tackle that evening.  The trail that was selected started behind our hotel and the steep climb started almost immediately.  It was unexpected!  Soon we were on a hillside covered with gorse, with a view into Loch Broom and the little town of Ullapool below us.  Our ferry boat was heading back out of Loch Broom to the Sea of Hebrides and on to Stornoway with the sun beginning its descent in the clouds behind the mountains.
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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe climb continued and did not let up.  We went beyond the initial destination of a bench that we had seen on the mountain from the bottom of the hill.  In the distance we sighted another challenge, the rocky top of Meall Mor.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERASome of us could not resist the challenge.  We made it to the top of that hill.  Loch Achall came into view on the other side of the hill, and towards the north stretched a rocky plateau.  One could imagine the Cape Wrath Trail running through this  challenging terrain all the way up to Durness.  Something to consider for another day, perhaps another life.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIn the other direction lay the end of Loch Broom.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe stopped for a minute to enjoy the view and add another rock to the cairn at the top.  We then turned to head back to town.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe sun was low in the sky when we got back and we set out to find a place to eat.  The pubs were busy but we did find a place to set our butts down and get a dram of the local nectar, a pint of beer, and some pub food.  After that we walked through town looking for the grocery store that we had seen on the map.  We then headed back to the hotel, enjoying the cool evening and the ice-cream bars that had just been purchased.  Folks settled down for the night to watch a horrendous movie called Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters.  Some of us rushed out of the room during the movie and ran through town trying to find a good place to experience the colorful sunset that I had gotten a hint of through the hotel window.  We were not very successful.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe next morning we went down to the hotel’s restaurant for another filling Scottish breakfast (which can include haggis, black pudding, sausage, bacon, eggs and beans). We then packed our bags and headed out.  The only other stop in town before we set ourselves on the road to Durness and our next round of adventure was at the petrol bunk.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Spare

My response follows Krista’s interpretation in her blog presenting the challenge.

The following pictures are from our recent trip to Scotland.  I thought the sparse landscape was “elegantly simple”.  You have to immerse yourself in what you are seeing to get an appreciation of the grandness of the somewhat stark landscape.  If you click through these pictures and view them on a screen with sufficient resolution, you might get a better sense of what we felt.

The first picture is of the landscape along the shores of the mainland as we sailed into Ullapool on the mainland from Stornoway in the Outer Hebrides.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe next picture is of the landscape and the road taken during our trip to Hushinish in a remote corner of the Isle of Harris in the Outer Herbrides.  The drive on a single lane road under adverse weather conditions was quite challenging and thrilling.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis last picture was taken when passing through the Cairngorm mountains of the Cairngorms National Park.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI hope one gets a better sense of the rugged beauty of the country of Scotland.

The Sun Rises Early in Scotland These Days

We just returned from a long vacation in Scotland. There were too many highlights for me to try to cover in a single posting.  It all started with our experiences in the vibrant city of Edinburgh.  This was followed by our travels around the country, including the Highlands, the Isle of Skye, and the Outer Hebrides.

Scotland is a beautiful land with a unique landscape including:
Rugged coastlines – with their massive weather-worn cliffs and their lonely lighthouses; beaches of white sand and clear blue waters; and meadows of soft wet grass above the cliffs that your feet sink into, with streams of water running through the meadows, with content sheep, and sometimes cows,  grazing in them;
Impressive rock-faced mountains towering over the landscape, sometimes with their tops in the cloud, their lower levels littered with  patches of yellow gorse at this time of year, and including trails that would  challenge the fittest person;
The numerous streams and rivers flowing through the valleys amidst the hills and mountains;

The landscape inter-spaced with its many lochs and firths lending a unique charm;
The numerous castles and ruins that surprise you at many a turn in the roadway;
and so on and so forth….

I should not leave out:
Walks and challenging hikes taken in our beautiful surroundings;
The thrill of the challenging drives through the narrow winding roads of the highlands, with single lane roads, timing yourself to pass cars going the other way in the occasional passing areas;

The experience of being at the Gordon Castle Highland Games.

Perhaps I should also not fail to mention:
The welcoming and easygoing people that populate this unique country;
Evenings at Bed and Breakfast establishments with their gracious hosts;
The family dinners at the pubs after long tiring days, accompanied by a pint of beer and/or a dram or two of scotch whisky;
Falling into a state of deep slumber at night that nobody could disturb, knowing that there was more to be experienced the next day;

Waking up early in the morning to start your explorations once again, only because the sun rises early in Scotland these days.

It all comes back to me in an jumbled and perhaps incoherent flow of thought.  Words will fail in any attempt to present a more organized picture of what we experienced unless I take a long time going about it.  So, for now, I will just show a sample of some of my pictures, with the hope that I will continue to feel the glow of the experience and am able to talk more about Scotland in future blogs.  Life will now return back to its regular pace, but the memories will not go away.

This picture of Edinburgh Castle taken from Holyrood Park. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
This picture was taken near Glencoe in the highlands.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
The following are from Cairngorms National Park.
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This is the Eilean Donan, reputed to be the castle most photographed. The weather did not cooperate for the picture.
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This one is from our walk at the Butt of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides.
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This is from Hushinish in the Other Hebrides.
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We climbed Meall Mor outside Ullapool.
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Early morning in Stornoway in the Outer Hebrides. (I awoke at 4am that morning because I could not sleep!)
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People awaiting the sunset on Calton hill in Edinburgh.
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From the Gordon Castle Highland Games.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
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These are a small sample of pictures taken.  I hope to share more of them in future blogs.

Unexpected Pleasures (Sept 10th, 2014)

One of the conversations I had with a high-school classmate during a reunion trip to New Mexico was regarding how much more accessible the outdoors have become here in the US since the days of our your youth when we came over from India.  It seems like there are many more parks and many more marked trails everywhere, created by all kinds of government and private entities, exposing us to more of the wonders of nature in the country.  It is a great thing!

But sometimes it is the unexpected that thrills the senses.  I was on my way to Cloudcroft, out of Alamagordo, driving up into the mountains on Route 82 from the high plains, when I came to a lookout point just before a tunnel.  This was a few miles away from Cloudcroft.  I could see White Sands behind me.
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The parking lot was empty except for this older couple who had come to the location on a motorbike.  The couple looked like a rough sort, and my first thought was caution.  (I was guilty of stereotyping!) But the woman was friendly.  She wished me hello and asked me if I had been on the trail.  I said I was not aware of the existence of a trail at this spot.  The gentleman then came up and told me about a trail that led from the lookout point down into the gorge between the hills where there was a stream flowing.  He said there were waterfalls.  He said that most people did not know about the trail, which was the best thing about this spot, and that he brought his grandchildren to the stream regularly.  Since I was being flexible in my schedule I decided that I would try the trail.  The gentleman told me that it started just beyond the lookout point, nearer to the tunnel, at a place where a black water pipe ran beside the road.  He then offered to walk up with me to show me the exact spot.  I grabbed my camera bag and followed.  When we arrived at the location of the pipe all I could see was a steep slope going down from the location of the pipe. I told myself that I was not going to give that slope a try today.  The gentleman laughed, saying that he would not attempt something like that at his age himself,  and then showed me a somewhat hidden trail leading off to the right, beside the road, on the other side of the guide rail.  He pointed to a cliff in the distance that the trail would pass and told me that there was a cave-like structure over there.  The cliff looked steep.  I was not convinced that would be passable but I was going to give it a shot.  I climbed over the guide rail and followed the unmarked trail.  Pretty soon I arrived at the cliff.  Indeed there was passable trail.
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Pretty soon I had descended the cliff and this is what I could see behind me.
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The parking lot seemed quite far away at the top of the cliffs, but in fact it had not taken me too long to get to this point.  Immediately in front of me was an opening into a shady wooded area.
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And there was indeed a stream flowing in the wooded area between the hills.
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I followed the stream to a series of very small waterfalls at the end of the trail.  I thought it was quite pretty.
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On the way back I took this picture.   It looked quite peaceful.
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During the walk back I also took my time to look at the flowers along the trail. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This was just the beginning of a wonderful (though tiring) day.

And here is another picture of White Sands, a place I was was going to visit later that day.
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Here is another blog I wrote during the trip to New Mexico.

A Vacation in Florida

Soft jazz in a quiet corner, a good book to delight,
Bursts of activity in the home occasionally interrupting the quiet,
Screams of happy kids in the pool, the fun continues late into the night.

Older, more “mature”, young adults creating their own space,
Adults catching up, walks around the neighborhood, it is no race,
The mingling of the generations, the constant laughter we all embrace.

Food and conversation, the sound of the washing machine occasionally interrupting the chatter,
Breakfast, lunch, and dinner being prepared, with gatherings around the kitchen table that matter.

A late night at the amusement park, kids still excited, still on their own two feet, the parents still stable,
Warm and humid days, a languorous mood, catching a movie, food and drink around a restaurant table,
A vacation in Florida with siblings and families if you are able.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Gatherings

One is tempted to submit a picture or two of a family gathering in honor of the holiday season for this challenge, but I will stick  with a different and perhaps more conventional interpretation of the theme.

These pictures are from our visit to La Langue de Barbarie near St. Louis in Senegal.

Here is a colony of seagulls.
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Here is a flight of cormorants.
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Finally, here is a squadron of pelicans.
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I submit that these pictures of gatherings of birds fits the theme for the week.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Oops!

I had to dig back in time to find a couple of themes that could perhaps be suitable for this challenge.   It is possible that they may be missing the mark regarding the objective of the challenge.

The C&O canal has had a history of problems dealing with the forces of nature even in its heyday.  The park that remains today where this canal once operated is particularly vulnerable even to this day, especially since there is little money available to the National Park Service (NPS) to maintain its 184.5 mile stretch along the Potomac river.  The aqueducts have suffered damage regularly, and the ones that are still standing are there primarily due to the efforts of volunteer organizations working with the NPS to preserve some of these historic structures.

In 2010 there was a massive snowstorm that hit the Washington DC area and the east coast of the United States called Snowmageddon!  Over the next few weeks the melting snow in the mountains caused massive flooding in the Potomac river and a disaster in the C&O canal park.   Here are a few pictures showing some of the problems caused by the weather.  I am happy to observe that the particular oops! seen below have been addressed over a period of time since that time.

 

In 2012 we visited West Africa and the country of the Republic of Guinea.  We did a lot of traveling while we were there.  It was an adventure of sorts considering the conditions of the roads and the vehicles in use.  In fact the highway that we took from Guinea to Senegal was essentially a dirt track winding through the mountains.  The vehicles on the road were in many cases several decades old, kept running by the ingenuity of the locals.  There was really no public transportation available, which led to amazing scenes of people and material stacked in and on decrepit vehicles traveling on the bad roads.  In any case, the circumstances were ideal for us to witness many oops! moments. Thankfully we were ourselves not involved in any serious incidents.

 

Altered States of Mind (1/1/2006)

I wrote this to my family on New Year’s Day 2006 after returning from a trip to India. I have added pictures to the narrative.  I hope it was a useful endeavor.

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I woke up at 38000 feet, high over the mountains of the Eastern Taurus range of eastern Turkey.  This is the birthplace of the Tigris and the Euphrates rivers that call to mind the beginnings of civilization. This is the land of Mt. Ararat and Noah’s ark.  I am headed northwest towards the cities of Erzurum, Trabzon, and the Black Sea, skirting Iraq and the trouble spots of Mosul and Kirkuk. The brilliant white peaks stretch all the way to the horizon, seemingly covered with a fresh layer of snow.  Below me is the town of Van, on the banks of the Van Golu, one of the big salt water lakes of Turkey.  It is a bright and beautiful morning, with not a single cloud in the sky to spoil the wonderful landscape that unfolds before my eyes as I lift the shade that covers the window next to seat 46A.  The sun reflects off the silver wing of the giant 747, the shining silver and bright blue on the engine cowling informing me that I am indeed on a British Airways jet.  The white contrails from the port engine closer to the fuselage speed past my window.  We are moving fast, and I am headed home.

This has been a quick and eventful trip to India.  The smell of Chennai welcomed me as I deplaned after the long flight from London. Long unruly lines met me as I proceeded through Immigration.  Chaos enveloped me as I attempted to locate my suitcase on the baggage carousel.  Arriving at Madipakkam in the wee hours of the morning, sleep escaped me.  Finding Mamma sitting on the floor of the kitchen later in the morning on the same day with a bloody gash on her head made it all seem so surreal.  Did I need to wake up?  Thank God the injury was not serious (although it did need stitches).

The rains of the unending monsoons of Chennai come poring down during the KV Alumni meeting day on the 17th of December.  The cricket match with the school kids is rained out with the Alumni team losing more wickets than scoring runs.  We are showing our age.  It feels great to meet people like Josey George after 30 years!  There are many other people to meet and stories to tell.

100_1324100_1326 100_1330The roads into Madipakkam are a mess.  I am bouncing around in a auto-rickshaw late in the evening in the pouring rain after the KV Alumni meeting, with the driver trying to avoid the potholes that make the road.  This is indeed not a road but a collection of holes.  An ordinary American vehicle would not last 100 yards without a broken axle!  You need an SUV. We make it home safely. Am I still dreaming?

Daddy is admitted to St. Isabel’s Hospital in the middle of town for the hernia operation.  I cannot sleep that night because of jet-lag.  It is raining outside.  The light goes on outside the window and I find Mamma headed for the gate in the middle of the night.  This cannot be happening.  It seems that the pump that has been turned on (to remove the water that is flooding our yard because of the rain) is not working.  The blasted pump needs to be primed at 3:30 am in the morning! It takes me a while to figure out the science of this process and get things going.  I must be awake – there is water spurting all over my hand from the pump as I stand in front of it holding a torchlight and spanner in the middle of the dark night.

100_1347Multiple trips are made to and from St. Isabel’s Hospital. The roller coaster that is the approach into Madipakkam from Velachery is navigated by taxi each and every time.  The road sees its share of stranded trucks and other vehicles.  Vehicles maneuver in all directions trying to find a safe path through the water-covered potholes of indeterminate depth.

100_1348I spend hours daydreaming in the taxis, stuck in the traffic jams and at the traffic lights of Chennai City itself.  Perhaps it is the effect of the pollution on the brain.  Maybe it is the mesmerizing effect of the chaos unfolding all around me.  Two wheelers, both human and gasoline powered, squeeze into impossible spaces.  Vehicles drive on all sides of the road.  People risk life and limb in the middle of this mess of traffic.  People go about their lives on the roadsides – I am sure there is a story to tell for each and every one of them.  Somebody should take this opportunity to study the theories of chaos.  Chaos actually works, though perhaps not in the most efficient manner.

Endless hours, most of it uneventful, are spent in the hospital environment, most of the time with a book in hand.  I find time to practice my music in a secluded corner of the building. The lazy breeze plays with the curtains covering the window of the hospital room in which I spend many hours conversing with Daddy.  I play the role of caretaker as Daddy comes out of surgery.  Anxious moments are felt as the doctors deal with the problem of the blockage of urine flow, and when we go down to the ground floor to get the ultrasound tests done.   What will the doctor say?   I have just finished reading Thomas Merton’s “The Seven Storey Mountain”.  Is this all part of the supernatural plan as Merton would lead me to believe?  Is this one of things that I was destined to do?  I also conclude that it is impossible to play the role of a patient in the hospital unless one is suitably humble.  You are put into unusual situations that you would normally not dream of being in.  Your real character shows.  You will suffer more than you need to if you have too much pride.  Between long periods of inactivity I am rushing around trying to get the medicines from the pharmacy, get the hospital bills paid, and get the discharge process completed.  It is an environment that I am not familiar with.  Nobody seems to care, nobody seems to be in a hurry.  I have not woken up from my dream yet.

I get adjusted… The celebrations for our 30 years after graduation from high school takes place at the Gandhinagar Club next to the Adayar river and bridge.

100_1371_closeupThe IIT Madras Silver Jubilee celebration also takes place after couple of days.  I see many faces from the old days, several only recognized after some initial conversation.  Thank God we are wearing badges with our names on them.  What a feeling of nostalgia!  A movie is seen at the Open Air Theatre (OAT) for old times sake – Where Eagles Dare.   I take a long walk covering the IIT campus in the early morning.  Health-conscious joggers do their daily exercises.  The deer wander all over the road unafraid of the humans.  The IIT Madras campus is still beautiful.  We are lucky to have grown up there.

100_1418100_1444The postponed trip to Bangalore to meet Amma and Appacha takes place.  It is good to see them and the rest of the gang.  This trip barely lasts a day.  It is now time to head home.  I am really not that tired in spite of the fact that I am not sure if I am coming or going.   When the doorbell rings I do not know what city or time-zone I am in.  I am keeping up because I am getting a lot of rest between activities.  I come to realize that the Madipakkam environment is really not too bad.  The volume of the street music in the morning has gone down – no more speakers from the temple on the street corner.  I love to walk on the terrace in the evenings, soaking in the street sounds including that of the buses bringing back the masses after their day at work, feeling the cool of the evening breeze coming in from the sea in the east, and listening to the planes heading to and from the airport.  It is time to enjoy the good things in life as they are, and to not get worked up about things that one cannot control.

I am now back in Gaithersburg.  I have survived the long flights and third-world toilets of Heathrow’s Terminal 4.  It is readjustment time once again.  It is cold and cloudy outside most of the time.  I have no motivation to get out and do things.  Just like me, my car also needs a lot of help to get started once again.  It is then back to work on the 3rd.  Give me a few days to get used to the changes.  Pictures will eventually be posted.

Happy New Year!

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http://www.pbase.com/kujoseph/indiadec2005

Flower from our garden in Chennai