The Green Effect

This picture was taken during our walk last Sunday.  It shows that you can get all kinds of shades and textures of the color green.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA The beginning of the walk was not very promising because the water in the canal at Dickerson, the place where we had parked, stank a lot, probably due the green growth in it.  Also, the stink in a couple of other locations due to dead animals did not help.  But once we got going, it was all OK.  Here is a picture of the ferry at Whites Ferry, the place where we turned to return to Dickerson.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe got in a little more than 8 miles, and collected a few pawpaws along the way.  The search for pawpaws was actually a little disappointing.  We don’t know whether it is because it is early in the season, or whether there are going to be less of the fruits this year for some other unknown reason.  In any case, the interest in consuming the fruit also seems to have decreased.

Quieten Your Mind

And the sign said, “The words of the prophets
Are written on the subway walls
And tenement halls”
And whispered in the sounds of silence
Simon and Garfunkel

In the quiet woods,
On a rise beside a bubbling creek,
A creek lit up by the rays of the rising sun,
The passing hiker arrives at a resting place with a sign on it that says,
Quieten your mindOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI am reminded of the song from my childhood.

The Flooding at the Monocacy Aqueduct

These pictures were taken during one of our Sunday walks towards the end of May.  The aqueduct carries the C&O canal across the Monocacy river.

This kind of flooding happens every once in a while, and most often during the spring season when we get a lot of rain.  The accumulation of the debris is somewhat unusual.  The last time it happened they had to bring in heavy equipment to remove the tree branches that were caught on the structure of the aqueduct and putting pressure on it.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Upstream side of the aqueduct
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Downstream of the aqueduct
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Debris stuck at the aqueduct, including significant amounts of trash
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
The extent of the flooding

The following picture was taken during the same walk at a different location on the trail.  This is upstream on the Potomac river.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Noland Ferry

In Search of a Story

My blogs have had the tagline of “Anything Goes” since the beginning, which could indicate either an aimless drift in a random direction, or, if you want to be kind, some sort of attempt on my part to include all of my disconnected interests in my postings.  You decide!  But one of the things that I hope you do discover in the blogs is that some of them tell stories of some kind or the other, be it that of the tree that grows in the woods, or something as silly as talking about the experience of consuming a bowl of cereal, or perhaps something else that takes my fancy at some particular moment in time. With this kind of a mindset, my response the topic of this week’s challenge comes somewhat easily.

My story for the day touches upon the “bomb cyclone“, a term that I had not heard of until very recently.  As I understand it, a bomb cyclone weather phenomenon is characterized by a rapid and large drop in barometric pressure, which leads to extreme wind speeds that can cause a lot of damage.   It leads to the story, in pictures, of last weekend’s walk along the C&O canal. This particular outing happened to take place after a bomb cyclone had passed through the region.

It was a sunny morning on the trail as we set out on our walk.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe encountered quite a few fallen branches on the trail due to the aftereffects of the storm, and, being good citizens, we spent a significant bit of our time cleaning up the trail for those who were going to come after us.  (We were not about to break any speed records that day.)  And then there were the sections where we could do little to help, sections that would require professional equipment for cleanup.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe did encounter cyclists who must have had to carry their bikes over fallen trees.

We did make it to our destination close to the mile 31 marker where Edwards FerryOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAand lock 25 are locatedOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAbefore turning back to return to our starting point.

The story would not be complete without a picture of the bald eagle that we encountered,OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAand a picture of the chopped up pieces of a fallen tree that we saw beside the trail, a little too late for Valentine’s  day.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA We did about 7 1/2 miles of walking that morning.  That is my story and I am sticking to it! 🙂

 

Autumn Finds Its Way To Our Neck Of The Woods

It has been a somewhat disappointing transition process in our surroundings so far this autumn season.  Other than the occasional exceptions, leaves have been slowly but surely falling off the trees without a hint of how colorful and pretty that process can be on a good year.   It must be the weather.  Nevertheless, we have persisted in looking for the signs of significant change as we walk the C&O canal towpath during the weekends.  Last weekend was a particularly drab one, with the threat of bad weather discouraging others in our group from walking with us.  But the two of us did go out to check out the changing of the seasons.

Regardless of how pretty the process of autumn is in our parts, one cannot escape the feeling of change in the air. The cooler, and soon to be cold, weather forces you to contemplate the winter months that lie ahead.  The changes in the landscape remind you that soon it will be time once again to batten down the hatches and power through a time of year that provides a challenge and a mood of its own.  The cycle goes on.

The Old Chain of Rocks Bridge

The Old Chain of Rocks bridge is just a short distance north of St. Louis, MO. This bridge used to carry the famous Route 66 highway across the Mississippi River. Today this bridge is limited to pedestrian and bicycle traffic and is part of a trail system that is being developed in the area.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIf you wish to visit the bridge by car, you should park on Chouteau Island on the Illinois side of the river. The parking lot on the Missouri side is closed off these days, most likely due to safety concerns.  You can also ride a bike from St. Louis to the bridge if you wish, or park a couple of miles away from the bridge on the Missouri side and walk.

This is the entrance to the bridge from Illinois.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is a pedestrian’s view of the bridge.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe bridge is unique because of a 22 degree bend in the middle.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere is some memorabilia on the bridge from the old days when it used to serve road traffic.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAYou find this rusted sign at the Missouri end of the bridge.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere also is a small rest area on the Missouri side of the bridge.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is what the entrance to the bridge from Missouri looks like.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe next few pictures are from the bridge.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe pictures below were taken from one of the trails on Chouteau Island.  The first picture also shows a water intake from the river, and the new Chain of Rocks bridge that carries Interstate 270 across the Mississippi.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Pawpaw

I had forwarded an article that I had read online regarding the pawpaw to some of our friends last week since the fruit was somewhat familiar to us from previous walks along the C&O canal.  The article noted that pawpaw was actually being grown on certain farms in our area, and that the fruit was extremely tasty, and that it was becoming more and more popular, just as it had been in times past.

It was a pure coincidence that we began to see signs of the pawpaw fruit as we started our Sunday morning walk today from Whites Ferry.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe noticed that the pawpaw trees were all over the place, and that there were fallen fruit under many of these trees.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOut of curiosity, we picked a few fruit along the way to take back home with us.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA We had reached the farthest point of our walk and were on our way back to the car when we we saw somebody walking towards us actually consuming one of the fruits that he had just picked.  So we started trying out the fruit ourselves.  It was extremely delicious and the flesh was easy to extract and eat.  It was a great treat! OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis discovery led to increase our collection of  pawpaw fruit from from the trees as we kept walking.  We shook the trees so that the ripening fruit would drop to the ground.  Some of the riper fruit was consumed immediately.  This is what we ended up with to take back with us.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Unfortunately, some of the fruit that we had collected to take back was too ripe and would not hold its form when carried.  By the time we got back to the car, some of them had burst, and we had no choice but to consume them immediately.  But some fruit did make it home.  So we will be having really fresh fruit for the next few days.  An experiment will also be conducted with the seeds…