The Fallen Leaves

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAA carpet of dead leaves covers the ground, lit up by the bright morning light.  The leaves glow in the warmth of the sun.  There is a beauty in the dying.

Before we know it, the golden leaves will all be swept away.  The winds of winter, even now, renew their strength. They blow our way from the north once again.  Soon we will be scurrying to find shelter from the bone-chilling cold as Old Man Winter reaches out with his icy fingers.

And this will pass eventually.  As Winter fades into Spring, the cycle will start once more. There will be renewal.  All this will happen without a care for what you or I think, and without care for your or my presence…  And so it goes.

The Sun is Finally Out Again

There are leaves on the ground all over our backyard.PB070001.jpg These are the days of transition, from the greens of summer, to greys and browns of winter.   The days in-between, the days of Autumn, can be quite pretty as we observe the dying of the leaves, but we have not had occasion to see much of that in our neck of the woods this year.  We did make the attempt during the last couple of weekends to see how things were on the towpath.  Two weekends ago,  we saw mainly green.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis was how it looked where we went last weekend, to a different section of the canal close to the place we had been to the previous week.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA We already seem to be at the end of the Fall phenomenon in these parts!  It was a surprising difference that we were seeing between the two places that were just a few miles apart over the the course of a week.

And then it started raining!  The wet leaves stuck to the grass and the pavement all around our neighborhood.  It stuck to the rooftops of cars parked on the street.  It got carried into the storm drains by the storm water flowing in the streets.

The dampness penetrated the layers of clothing and made one feel miserable and wanting to crawl back under the sheets.  There was no motivation to go outside and do some exercise, something that was needed badly!

But the sun is out today.  I am optimistic about what the day can bring.

Autumn Finds Its Way To Our Neck Of The Woods

It has been a somewhat disappointing transition process in our surroundings so far this autumn season.  Other than the occasional exceptions, leaves have been slowly but surely falling off the trees without a hint of how colorful and pretty that process can be on a good year.   It must be the weather.  Nevertheless, we have persisted in looking for the signs of significant change as we walk the C&O canal towpath during the weekends.  Last weekend was a particularly drab one, with the threat of bad weather discouraging others in our group from walking with us.  But the two of us did go out to check out the changing of the seasons.

Regardless of how pretty the process of autumn is in our parts, one cannot escape the feeling of change in the air. The cooler, and soon to be cold, weather forces you to contemplate the winter months that lie ahead.  The changes in the landscape remind you that soon it will be time once again to batten down the hatches and power through a time of year that provides a challenge and a mood of its own.  The cycle goes on.

Chaos in the Fall

Here are some pictures that capture some of the chaotic elements of the season of Fall from the visual perspective.  There is the appearance of the fallen leaves as seen below.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere are the branches on the trees (in this case our red maple tree), even as colors change during a span of a couple of days.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAFinally, here are a couple of scenes from the woods during the fall process.   In the past I have not thought about these kinds of views as being chaotic, but there is a certain randomness to the elements that contribute to the overall appearance that leads me to conclude that it does meet the definition of such a process.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAPerhaps the fact that a particular process appears to be chaotic does not necessarily mean that there is something wrong with it.  Here are other interpretations of chaos.

The Passage of Time (10/5/2009)

Not sure if this fits into the weekly category, but since life is a quest for something or the other, I decided to post this old letter from 2009 with a few pictures I took at that time…

img_1612The leaf dropped out of the tree and was caught by the gentle Autumn breeze as it fell from the sky.   I swung my arm lazily as I ran by, as the leaf drifted across the trail.  Amazingly I made contact and the leaf ended up in my hand.  Alright!, I said to myself. At least that is what I thought I was doing.   But these days I am sometimes not sure if I am speaking to myself, or if I have said something out aloud without realizing it.  But it did not matter in this instance since I was all by myself.   I could behave like an happy two year old without having to worry about somebody looking at me in a strange way because I was not “acting my age”.
img_1602img_1652Perhaps, this is one reason I enjoy being out there on the trail.  I can scream out loud with a sense of wonder every time the heavy locomotives of the freight trains power past me.  I can even sing loudly to myself with only the flowers, the birds, and the occasional curious squirrel hanging around to hear the cacophony.  I can drop the burden of “expected” behavior and be myself.  I can take unplanned diversions from the trails into the unmarked woods if I want.  I can follow the butterfly or dragonfly as it flitters from flower to flower, hoping it settles down long enough at one location without flying away at my approach, so that I can take its picture.  (It does require a lot of patience!)  It is truly a healing process to get away from “civilization”.  Maybe I have a stupid smile on my face when I am out in the woods, and this why the few people I encounter seem to respond to me with a pleasant Good Morning.  Maybe they are all as crazy as I am.

The heat of summer is behind us and the cooler days of Autumn have arrived.  There are the cool and crisp Fall mornings – with the clear and bright blue skies, with the occasional fluffy wisps of clouds floating by – looking like light cotton balls that are being gently pulled apart by some unseen hand in the sky.  There are the cold and gloomy mornings, when the clammy feeling penetrates your jacket, and even your skin, when the heavens are filled with dark ominous clouds that block the sun and scurry across the sky, as if in a hurry, eager to get somewhere.
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The leaves are just beginning drop from the trees and there are already a few spots of reds and yellows in our neighborhood and on the trail.  The Frittilary that I saw in large numbers at the beginning of summer in Black Hill park have long since gone, and so have the somewhat rarer Monarchs.  There is still the occasional Tiger Swallowtail to be seen, but other than a few Skippers, this really seems to be the season for the Sulphurs.
img_1587The unidentified dragonflies and damselflies are still around in smaller numbers, occasionally flying around in pairs as if they were indulging in some sort of mating ritual (perhaps they are!), but they will also disappear as surely as the butterflies and the leaves on the trees.

The various types of ducks that I used to observe at Black Hill have long since gone, and I am looking forward to Spring when I hope to see the somewhat rarer migratory species once again.  The Canada Geese that are supposed to be migratory never left, and they dominate the lake and the river these days.   The cardinals are still around, but the robin will only return in spring.  My good friends, the blue heron, can very frequently be seen in certain sections of the canal fishing.  (Yesterday I saw a whole bunch of cormorants perched on some rocks in the middle of the Potomac near Harpers Ferry.  I was even fortunate to capture the picture of a raptor, perhaps it was an eagle or a osprey, diving into the waters of the Potomac to come up with a fish that it had caught!)
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The last flowers of summer can still be seen in the woods of Black Hill and along the towpath – the purple chicory, some white and purple fleabane, some asters, a few goldenrods, and some others that I still cannot identify.  I wish I had more time!img_1597
img_1649img_1668I cannot wait to experience the vast expanses of the fields of Virginia bluebell on the towpath in Spring.

And thus the days, the seasons, and the years go by, and one finds that one has survived to reach the age of 50!  (Teresa had arranged a great surprise Birthday party!  Thanks to John from arranging his trip from Bangalore so that he could spend the evening with us.)  The times seem to rush by in a hurry, and before I knew it, over 20 years of marriage have gone by and the kids have all grown up.   In just a few years the next generation will be ready to take over the reins from us, and eventually we will also be consigned to the dust.  The cycle of life will continue. I have to remind myself constantly that we need to do our best while we are here, and that we also need to make the best of what we have without being greedy.  In tough times I have to try to remember that I am one of the fortunate ones, and that the present will eventually become the past.  In the short time that we have here on Planet Earth, perhaps we can try to leave our mark by doing something positive for others, and we can also try to leave the world in a better shape than we found it.  Maybe, just maybe, this could be The Meaning of Human Life.

Life goes on.   Keep on Truckin…
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Weekly Photo Challenge: Look Up!

Having been in the habit of spending a lot of time outdoors in the woods on my feet during the last few years, it is instinctive for me to look up to enjoy my surroundings.

Taken to an extreme one can look directly up a tree. A clear blue sky, either through the leafless branches of a tree in winter, or through the greenery of the leaves of the many trees in summer is memorable.
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One can also look forwards and upwards into the distance on a trail to capture a perspective like this.
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Sometimes you do not have to look up that far to ahead of you to observe something notable above you and around you.
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If I had not looked up I would have missed the northern flicker in the following picture,
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAor the red-headed woodpecker in this one.
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Sometimes you look up to the sight of something simple like these birds on a wire, seemingly in some form of communication with each other,
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAor you might see a sight like this Norfolk Southern locomotive crossing the Potomac on a trestle bridge looking distinctive in the early morning light.
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If you do not look up you could miss the great blue heron that flies high over the Monocacy Aqueduct,
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAor the small  and colorful aircraft that lights up the cloudless sky over the river.
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Don’t forget to look up!

A Walk on a Foggy Morning

The fog began to increase in intensity as we approached the parking lot at Carderock next to the Potomac river and the C&O canal.  The temperature was below freezing as we bundled up and stepped out of the car and on to the trail.  The sun began to rise into the sky through the  trees behind us as we started our walk at a brisk pace, trying to get rid of the cold in our extremities.  The fog began to lift slowly, creating a unique and somewhat surreal lighting over the still waters and in-between the trees.  There was some kind of magic happening!

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The sky had completely cleared up by the time we finished our walk and returned to the parking lot a couple of hours later.