Colorado, Utah, and Arizona by Car – The Epilogue

(You might notice that the subject line for this sequence of blogs has finally gotten corrected in the last posting of the series!  It’s the least I could do.)

It happened when we were in Kanab, UT.  It had been a while since we had gone to a Chinese Restaurant.  Luo’s Cafe was close enough to the hotel for us to walk to.  The food, and especially the hot soup, was welcome on a cold evening after the active day in Zion National Park. We got fortune cookies at the end of dinner.  The one I opened up said “In the near future, you will discover how fortunate you are.”  I have thought of myself as very fortunate for many years of my life.  So this message about making a “discovery” was incorrect in a way, but considering the nature of the trip that we were making, it was still interesting, and perhaps timely, anyway.  The other fortune cookie had the message “It is better to have beans and bacon in peace than cakes and ale in fear.”  Please contact me if you can figure that one one out!

Here are some stats from the trip.
According to the odometer in the car, we covered 2579 miles during this trip.  This might be equivalent to driving across the country.

The places we stayed in were Denver, Estes Park, and Parachute, in Colorado; Moab and Monticello in Utah; then Monument Valley and Page in Arizona; back to Kanab, Cannonville and Torrey in Utah; and finally Red Cliff and Denver in Colorado.

The National Parks we visited were Rocky Mountain, Arches, Canyonland (two different sections), Mesa Verde, Northern Rim of the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce and Capitol Reef.  Places visited also included Monument Valley, Pike’s Peak, Four Corners, and a few state parks.  We passed through numerous interesting little towns, including places like Escalante in Utah, and Parachute, Red Cliff, and Leadville in Colorado.  We did drive through a town called “No Name”, and drove past a restaurant called the “Bla, Bla, Blah Cafe” towards the end of the trip.

Most of the travel was on the Colorado Plateau.   We started off at an elevation of slightly over 5400 feet, in Denver, and probably stayed at an altitude above that most of the time, finally hitting over 14,100 feet at Pikes Peak.

The weather cooperated for the most part.  Even when it rained in the night or in the morning, it would clear out in time so that we could do something outside.  We had some really cold mornings, even around 20 degrees Fahrenheit, but it usually warmed up enough for us to get going.  We always dressed in layers, and the outerwear would go into the backpack as we warmed up during a walk.  The snow that we experienced was not significant enough to cause problems, but it did bring an additional element of beauty to our travels.

One of the surprises for me was the fact there are still cowboys in the west, and that cattle still roam the open range in Utah.  There is definitely still a western culture.  Another delightful surprise was the discovery of the town of Red Cliff in Colorado.  I could have spent more time in that area, including a drive through Shrine Pass.  I could probably have also spent some more time at places like Cortez, Escalante and Leadville.  But we had other places to get to.

People we encountered were generally nice and helpful.  Conversations were not very deep. Politics never came up and that helped us stay out of trouble.  The servers at the restaurants were mostly  genuine and hardworking, and we ended up talking to some of them, and even tipping more than usual.

There were many tourists from Europe.  I  noticed very few black families in the parks.   This is unfortunate. On the other hand, the number of oriental tourists we encountered was staggering. For a reason I cannot fathom, tourists from India are found in large numbers in Page, AZ.

It took me a significant amount of organizing effort to make sure that we had a place to stay every night of the trip, and that these places would be suitably located relative to things that I thought were good to experience.   There was no issue with any of the hotel reservations, and some of the facilities had their own character and were interesting in themselves.  There might be one or two changes that I would make if I had to do this again, mainly related to location, but things worked out nicely for the most part.  I had also created a list of things that sounded interesting to see and do for every place that we stayed at.

I did all the driving, but Teresa worked out all the details of packing and unpacking and managing the stuff that we carried during our hikes.  My outerwear to handle cold weather stayed in the back seat of the car for the most part when I was not wearing it.  I spent significant amount of time every evening, and the next morning, working on the blog for the day.   I used to wake up very early in the morning and slept less than usual overall.  It must have been the difference in time zones that I never adjusted to.  But I have also noticed that something like this happens to me every time I make a trip like this.

We jointly decided what we would try to see and do on a particular day, and it mostly worked out.  We were flexible in planning and adjusting when things did not go exactly as planned, especially when it rained.  Sometimes the advance planning was minimal.  We did not see everything we would have liked to.  There was not enough time.  We did most things together – there were a couple of occasions when I did a little extra on the trails.  We managed to not get on each other’s nerves too much.  It was good teamwork.  Teresa actually started proof-reading my blogs after the first few days.  I know it helped, but I suspect that a bunch of editorial stuff still needs to be addressed.  I will try to fix errors as I find them.

The return to Gaithersburg and reality was smooth but I would not call it pleasant.  The election season is upon us, and it is the season of lying and spreading fear.   But a day at the Manna food bank revived my spirit somewhat.

I did manage to rescue the jacket that I had left at the security checkpoint on our way out of Dulles Airport on the 6th.  Some people may not be happy about that, hoping that this rather tattered piece of clothing would disappear.  But I think there is something to be said about being sentimental about old things.

Here is the link to a page that lets you access all the blogs for the trip in the correct order.

By the way, this is an amazingly beautiful country!

 

 

Colorado and Utah by Car – Day 7

We took a quick walk around the town of Monticello, UT, before we departed for Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado.   I usually find something charming about these little places, but Monticello seemed to be just another town on the road to somewhere else.  There was nothing that caught my senses particularly.  Here are some pictures.  This picture is of the sunrise and it was taken from behind our roadside motel.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is the front of our motel.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERASome of the locals were going for a morning run.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAA local Native American store.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe Abajo mountains rise from the morning fog west of town.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe were being careful about making sure that we did not run out of gas (petrol).  So, we filled up even though we had used only a quarter tank of gas, turned east at the only traffic signal in Monticello, and pointed our way towards the rising sun on US 491 (not an Interstate Highway).  We passed through the city of Cortez on our way to the entrance to Mesa Verde.

We arrived at Mesa Verde by about 9:30 and it was already too late for the ranger guided tour that we were interested in.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe only slot available was for the 3:50pm tour, and that was too late for our drive to Monument Valley in the evening.  We also realized that we had not given ourselves enough time to explore the place leisurely.  So the visit was a little rushed.

The primary theme of this park is the history of the Pueblo Indians who have lived in this area for a very long period of time.  You can see the ruins of their living spaces and communities spread out over the area, many of them under ledges in cliffs.  But reaching the areas where you can see these artifacts also requires long drives on the park roads.  The drives were actually quite thrilling over the mountain roads, some of them quite narrow and open only to smaller vehicles.  Our first stop to see the historical artifacts was for the Step House at the end of the narrow Wetherill Mesa Road.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt is was a long way down to get to the Step House from the parking area on top of the cliff.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe cliff dwellings were usually under a ledge that provided some protection.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAYou can see how far down one must go to reach the dwellings.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe then headed back to the main park road to the Museum at the end of the road.  Here are a couple of pictures.  We were rushing.  This is the Spruce Tree House,OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAand this is the Cliff Palace.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAnd before we knew it, it was time to head out of the park to Monument Valley, a drive of about three hours.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis drive was notable for the fact that for the most part we were passing through land that was barely populated and was essentially featureless compared to what we had experienced so far. US 160 on which we were heading west ran straight for long periods of time.  You could occasionally see the horizon in the distance at the end of a particularly long stretch of straight road. The speed limit on these smaller roads was 65 miles per hour, but folks were overtaking me every once in a while.  We did make a stop at Four Corners, where the states of Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona, all meet at a single point.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe place is managed by the Navajo, and, frankly speaking, I got a rather poor impression of the way they maintained and operated things at a location that has now become a somewhat well recognized tourist attraction.

We arrived at Monument Park as the sun was setting.  This horse had left its companions and wandered on to the side of the road as we were driving in.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAHere are some pictures of the sunset.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe are staying at the only hotel here, The View, built on Navajo land, and owned by a Navajo entrepreneur lady.  The first order of business was dinner at the only restaurant in this isolated place on the border of Utah and Arizona.

Our room has a beautiful view of the valley and the sunrise is expected to be spectacular.  We will see.  We head out to Page, AZ, later today.

Colorado and Utah by Car – Day 3

The morning started with the sighting of elk from our hotel room window.  They were crossing a side street and somebody’s property.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThese animals own the place.

It had snowed overnight.  After breakfast of some pastries we had bought in the supermarket, we headed out into the park. On the way we saw these elk bulls butting heads.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOnce in the park, we got a picture of ourselves at the entrance.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADue to incomplete instructions from the ranger the day before, and because of plans being made on the fly, it took a while to get to the trail head that we finally decided to hike from.  We started at the Park and Ride lot on Bear Lake road at about 8800 feet elevation and took the trail to Bierstadt Lake. The temperature was 30 degrees F when we started. We climbed through the snowy woods.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt was tough! We reached a spot by the lake after a couple of miles, and an hour and a half of laborious climbing.  It was a small lake, which had its own beauty in the snow.  The altitude was supposed to be 9460 feet.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe took a different trail down the side of the mountain to the actual official trail head for the climb to this lake on the way back to the car.  The view of the valley as we switchbacked down the mountain was spectacular in spite of the weather.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt would have been much more amazing if the skies had been clear.  At the bottom of the mountain we turned east, and we walked on a trail that ran along the road, back to the parking lot at the Park and Ride location.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAFive miles of walking!  The temperature had risen to 37 degrees by then.

After a lunch of peanut butter, carrots, and fruit, and a Clif bar for myself, we drove to Bear Lake. The lake itself is at a height of about 9600 feet.  It was back to freezing temperatures – 32 degrees F – because of the altitude!  After a short and quick walk around the lake,OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAwe hit the roads to head out of town.  We had a 250 mile ride ahead of us.

We headed south past the town of Boulder, and picked up Interstate 70 at Golden, CO, the birthplace of Coors beer.  There was only time for a stop to fill gas (petrol) and get a quick drink of hot chocolate.

Then began the most spectacular ride on Interstate 70 towards the place we were staying for the night – Parachute, CO. We crossed the Rocky mountains. The weather was all over the place during the ride through the mountains, but it was a notable experience nonetheless.  That part of the ride started with heavy fog in a winding section of the road as we climbed into the mountains.  I was not happy at that point.  We then encountered rain and snow in some other sections, and in some places it looked like the sky was going to clear up.  We crossed the the mountains through a tunnel above 10000 feet. It was clear on one side and we could see the snow covered mountains of the Rockies for the first time,OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAand on the other side of the tunnel it was snowing so heavily that the surface of the road was covered with snow and traffic was moving more slowly. The weather kept changing.  We went past the ski towns of Breckenridge and Vail.  It started raining lightly once again as we drove through Glenwood Canyon at the western end of the ride through the mountains. We emerged from the windy section of the road at Glenwood Springs and the ski area of Aspen.

Glenwood Canyon was spectacular, with the highway hugging the vertical sides of the canyon, supported by various concrete structures, the Colorado river below us, and the Denver and Rio Grande railroad line on the other side of the Colorado river.  (I may be wrong, but it is possible that Amtrak’s California Zephyr train from Chicago to San Francisco runs on this line.)

After another over hundred miles of driving past towns with names like Gypsum, Silt, and Rifle, we arrived at Parachute. We drove into the sunset as the skies cleared out a little bit.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAfter dinner with margaritas at the Mexican place in this small town, we crashed out.  This tiny place looks interesting. We can probably see everything there is in town in 15 minutes.  The hotel room was remarkably affordable, and recommended to anyone coming this way.

Now it is on to Moab, and Arches and Canyonlands National Parks.  The weather should be warmer from now on.

Colorado and Utah by Car – Days 1 and 2

The first day was a travel day.  Left later in the evening for Denver. The flight and the arrival at the hotel was uneventful.  But the hotel was a surprise!  For a very reasonable price we had ended up in a fantastic place.  Here is the atrium of the hotel, seen before daybreak.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAfter Sunday Mass, we headed for Rocky Mountain National Park.  Nice drive.  Drove up from the mile-high city of Denver into the town of Estes Park.  We knew we were in Colorado when we saw this.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe found Estes Park to be an extremely touristy and crowded place, although we did get a nice view driving into the valley where it is located.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA When we reached the visitor center for the park, we were in for a disappointment.  The Trail Ridge Road and the Old Fall River Road that crossed over the ridge of the mountains to the west were both closed due to snow, and it looks like they will be closed for the rest of the season since more snow is expected today.

We drove as far as we could on on the Trail Ridge Road.  As we got higher, above two miles in altitude, we began to experience rapid changes in the weather.  The skies would be clear one moment and the next moment we would be enveloped in fog.  We even began to see signs of snow.  The drive ended at Rainbow Curve, beyond which the road was closed.  The mountains would appear and disappear in the distance.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt is the autumn season here, but the primary color other than the green of the evergreens is yellow.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt is rutting season for the elks.  The bulls coral their large groups of “ladies” and go at it making loud bugling noises to manage the whole situation.  Elks are all over the place and tourists are also stopped everywhere to look at them.  The animals can come pretty close and stop traffic when they cross the roads.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe are experiencing both real and imagined issues with breathing because of the altitude.  We should be fine.  We are taking some medication.

It is supposed to snow today, but we are going to try to do some walks today before we head for our stop for the night, Parachute, Colorado.  So far things are not going exactly as initially planned, but that is is fine.  What are you gonna do? Our middle name ought to be “Flexibility”.

As I type this in the morning in my hotel room, I looked out of the window to find some elk crossing the main road.  I will post a picture in the next blog.

Fair warning that they blogs are being generated on the fly with minimum additional editing at this time. I might fix things later.