If it’s Saturday once again, it is time to head back home

This was the last day of our wanderings before we headed back down to Massachusetts.

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Well known, and somewhat historical, breakfast place. In Sugar Hill in the Franconia Notch area
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Bridge across the Pemigewasset River river on the trail to the Flume Gorge
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Trail up the Flume Gorge
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In the sometimes heavy rain!
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Sentinel Pine Bridge and Pool on the Flume Gorge trail
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Sentinel Pine Bridge
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Storm Clouds over the mountains
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Rocky Gorge area, Swift River, next to the Kancamagus Highway
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The Swift River

And thus our adventures on this vacation come to an end!

Bridging the Gaps

I am a big fan of bridges, and I admit that I have taken too many pictures of them.  I think that some of the bigger ones, especially the suspension bridges, are marvels of engineering design.  The fact that we have figured out ways to use the laws of physics to construct these gigantic, and often beautiful and majestic, structures to leap across wide open spaces and voids in such a seemingly effortless manner (a perception that is deceptive) is remarkable.  The manner in which the roadways hang in the air, suspended from cables attached to elegant piers that rise from the ground or the water into the air to tower over the bridges themselves, is amazing.  And many of us take these structures for granted while using them in our everyday lives, with not an appreciation or understanding of, or interest in, the ingenuity that went into their construction.

But having said all that, I would like to take a different tack for this week’s challenge.  I will just focus on some more down-to-earth “bridge” encounters from our recent trip to New England.  These are simpler bridge stories from the other end of the spectrum.  The physics involved is quite simple in many cases.  These pictures will show that as far as the simple act of walking or hiking is involved, there are many basic ways that are used to bridge obstacles that may appear in front of you.  In some cases, even the simple rocks found in nature will offer you a bridge!

The following pictures are from the Camden State Park in Maine.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is from a hike up Gorham mountain on Mt. Desert Island in Maine.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThese bridges are a few of the many on a trail in the Flume Gorge area in New Hampshire.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis bridge carries a trail across the Winooski River in Montpelier, VT.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERABridges, in many different forms, are an essential part of our lives today.