The Turning of the Seasons and The Return of Spring

When you think about it, the existence of the seasons on our planet is a pretty amazing phenomenon.  I say this even though we know why it happens.  As most of us are aware, there is a solid scientific explanation for the seasons.

But, even with your knowledge of how things work, you can also look at things from a somewhat different perspective.  Our planet is very, very, far away from its source of energy, the sun, averaging a distance of about 93 million miles in its elliptical orbit. In spite of the distance, just because of the nature of the earth’s axis of rotation with respect to its plane of revolution around the sun, we experience the phenomenon of the seasons.  The variations in the amount of energy from the sunlight falling on the earth at different latitudes at different times of the year leads to localized changes in climate on a tiny speck of dust in the Universe, the earth, even though it is million of miles from the source of the energy, and furthermore the impacts are still quite predictable.  One should stop and think about that. Also consider that in the grand scheme of things, this energy could be considered minuscule, indeed it is an almost insignificant fraction of the total energy being spewed out from the sun.  And this energy is continuously changing because the sun is not static. But even the second-order differences in this small amount of energy at different times of the year at different latitudes are so well defined as to give us the seasons.  All because of the tilt of the earth’s axis!

And this little bit of the energy that the earth receives from the sun is just the right amount to create our lifeforms, and also impact them in different ways in different parts of the world in a manner that we can understand.  Too much or too little of this little tiny bit of the continuously changing energy of the sun and things would be very different.  It is crazy amazing!

As Spring arrives in our parts, the energy from the sun has warmed the ground and revived the latent life that has remained hidden in our vegetation through the winter.  Brown is turning to green.   It may seem to be happening suddenly, but there is actually a process that carries on through the year.  Things happen at a certain pace in keeping with the change in the energy received from the sun.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe energy of the sun brings flowers to life at this time of  year.  Redbuds and dandelions, and a multitude of other flowers of many different kinds, bloom along the towpath.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAt this time of year the Spring Beauty can even take over some areas of the woods.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Other lifeforms also seem to be celebrating the return of Spring.  For some reason the turtles in the picture below have shells of different colors even though they are all of the same kind. It looks as if one is wet, one is dry, and the third one is in some state in-between!OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe snapping turtle below raises its head from the water, and proceeds to spit out a stream of the water.  I wonder what it was doing under water. I also saw a second snapping turtle with its head underwater for a long time.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAnd the woods echo with the endless songs of the birds.   The colorful cardinal stands out in the foliage.  Its music follows a repetitive pattern that is not that simple.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA The restless tapping of the woodpecker on the dry branch of the tree resounds loudly through the woods.  It is a drummer in a marching band tapping out a rhythm of nature on its instrument, its beak.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAnd as I walk through the woods, I also receive the gift of the energy in a different way.  I can also feel the change that seems to be being celebrated all around me.  The feeling is palpable.  If I choose to, I can also become one with the remarkable transformation that is taking place around me. And I can immerse myself in the feeling.  I can try to feel our oneness with the other life.  I can try to understand how we are all a part of this Nature.  And I can act accordingly, in a harmonious manner. In a sense, this could be a sacred place of unity.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe are all a part of the same experience of life on earth, an earth that is but a speck of dust in the vastness of the Universe.  Our behaviors on this earth ought to reflect this truth.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Chair

Walking along the Potomac river, between Taylor’s Landing and Dam 4 on the C&O Canal towpath, we came across this somewhat strange sight on the West Virginia side of the river.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWas this chair placed there so that somebody could spend the day fishing, or simply watching the flow of the river?

Was this chair placed there by a kind soul for the benefit of other people – so that they too could enjoy their day and time sitting by the riverside?

Considering that the chair was in a location that seemed to be hard to get to, at a place that you had to drive down a steep dirt road to reach,  at a spot beside the river where the surface seems to be unsuitable for a comfortable walk, is it even possible that the chair was simply swept down the river to land upright in this location and position?P3310030.jpg

You can let your imagination wander, see whatever you wish to see, and make up your own stories, as you walk down the towpath on a Sunday morning.

Wind and Water

During our walk along the canal last weekend, my attention was drawn to the pattern of reflections that I was seeing on the surface of the water in the canal.

I was first drawn to the lines in the water, and also the wavy patterns formed by the reflection of the tree trunks.  It would be interesting to understand how these regular patterns form.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe intensity of the lines began to diminish with time, which indicated to me that the phenomenon that was causing them was diminishing with time.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe following pattern that I saw soon after that caught me by surprise.  It looked like I was seeing blocks in the water, with clear demarkations between blocks.  It was hard to comprehend the physical forces that were causing this to occur.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe reflections in the following picture are more conventional, and what I expect to see this time of the year when the water is almost calm.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere is much to see while taking a walk on a Sunday morning if you keep you eyes and ears open to the beauty of nature.

The Sun is Finally Out Again

There are leaves on the ground all over our backyard.PB070001.jpg These are the days of transition, from the greens of summer, to greys and browns of winter.   The days in-between, the days of Autumn, can be quite pretty as we observe the dying of the leaves, but we have not had occasion to see much of that in our neck of the woods this year.  We did make the attempt during the last couple of weekends to see how things were on the towpath.  Two weekends ago,  we saw mainly green.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis was how it looked where we went last weekend, to a different section of the canal close to the place we had been to the previous week.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA We already seem to be at the end of the Fall phenomenon in these parts!  It was a surprising difference that we were seeing between the two places that were just a few miles apart over the the course of a week.

And then it started raining!  The wet leaves stuck to the grass and the pavement all around our neighborhood.  It stuck to the rooftops of cars parked on the street.  It got carried into the storm drains by the storm water flowing in the streets.

The dampness penetrated the layers of clothing and made one feel miserable and wanting to crawl back under the sheets.  There was no motivation to go outside and do some exercise, something that was needed badly!

But the sun is out today.  I am optimistic about what the day can bring.

Mornings in the Park

Went for a bike ride last Wednesday.  Here are a couple of pictures.

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Morning sun cuts through the leaves and the lingering mist

 

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At Widewater

The water levels in the river are quite high, but well below flooding levels. This is near mile 8 of the towpath.

 

Managed to get from Pennyfield Lock to Bethesda on the towpath and the Capital Crescent Trail.  It was a more laid-back ride this time, but for some reason more tiring.

The Green Effect

This picture was taken during our walk last Sunday.  It shows that you can get all kinds of shades and textures of the color green.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA The beginning of the walk was not very promising because the water in the canal at Dickerson, the place where we had parked, stank a lot, probably due the green growth in it.  Also, the stink in a couple of other locations due to dead animals did not help.  But once we got going, it was all OK.  Here is a picture of the ferry at Whites Ferry, the place where we turned to return to Dickerson.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe got in a little more than 8 miles, and collected a few pawpaws along the way.  The search for pawpaws was actually a little disappointing.  We don’t know whether it is because it is early in the season, or whether there are going to be less of the fruits this year for some other unknown reason.  In any case, the interest in consuming the fruit also seems to have decreased.

Of Photographs and Stories

I felt that I had to bike today because I had not gotten out for my regular exercise in over a week.  The temperatures had been in the “dangerous” range, and it was dropping to more comfortable levels today.  I left home very early, and was surprised by the large number of cars in the parking lot at Pennyfield Lock at that time on a weekday.  The sun was still rising as I set out.  I saw a large number of bicyclists at the lock house for Pennyfield Lock as I approached the towpath.  It was obvious that they had spent the night there as a part of the Canal Quarters program.  I then turned on to the towpath headed for Washington, DC.

The level of water in the river is low right now.  It has not rained for a few days.  Work at different sections of the canal where there were detours – the waste weirs near Great Falls, and mileposts 7 and 9, are being rebuilt – was already underway for the day.  I even had to navigate my way around a truck bringing in material to a construction site.  I can see that the work at the different sites is coming along.  I believe there is a long term plan to re-water the entire stretch of canal starting at Violette’s lock.  The current work could be a part of that long term effort.  Wonder if I will survive long enough to see the end result!

Pretty soon after I got on the trail I realized that I had not taken my camera.  I had been thinking primarily about the exercise aspect of the ride and had forgotten.  But it did not bother me.  However, a few miles into the ride, my thoughts drifted towards the thinking process behind taking pictures.  (It was that kind of a morning!) To me, it is not necessarily just about taking a picture that looks good, but it is more about capturing a story.  Sometimes, a single picture can tell a story.  But, these days, I also like to add pictures to a story that is being told with words to give it more character.  This is something that did not do in the past.  In spite of the fact that I did not have my camera with me, I did get to a point during this ride when I felt the need to stop and take a picture with my smartphone to somehow capture how it felt at that time during the ride.  That would be the story.  The first time I had this feeling I did not stop because I was focused on the exercise aspect of the ride.  But a few hundred feet later, I came to another point where I could not resist the temptation to take a picture.  Here it is.IMG_20180907_083242125When I reached Fletcher’s Cove, I got on to the Capital Crescent Trail headed in the direction of Washington, DC.  The ride on this trail is smoother than on the towpath since it is paved. As I approached DC, I began to feel a rhythm of the wheel that was unusual.   There was a bouncy feeling, and very little noise associated with it.  When I got to the end of the ride at the far end of the Georgetown Waterfront, I decided to check out the tire and realized that there was a bump in one small section. Oh, oh!  It looked like the tire was about to blow out, and I was about 20 miles from home.  I had been barreling down the towpath over pieces of gravel on my way out  (remember, this particular ride was about the exercise, and not necessarily sightseeing – each ride has a different feel to it!).  I had to either find a local bike shop to replace the tire, or bike more carefully on my way back.  I decided to risk it and bike back, but only after releasing some air from the tire to reduce the pressure.  I did manage to make it back to Pennyfield lock in good shape and in good time.

I found a few pawpaw fruit on the ground during this ride.  Perhaps it is time to return to the section of the trail that had an abundance of these fruits last year.

The rhythm of life goes on.