Photography and Transience

When thinking about the subject matter for this week’s photo challenge, I came to the realization that most of my photography as a amateur hobbyist is about capturing pictures of something that I am experiencing from a transient perspective, even if that transience is simply from the perspective of my own experience and circumstance and not necessarily because the physical scenario that I am dealing with.  For example, if I were to go to a new place or a place I do not visit often, perhaps, as a tourist, I would be more inclined to take pictures of that place than somebody who lives in that place and sees the same thing day after day. The experience is transient for me and I am trying to capture my transient moment with a picture.

But this definition might be too broad, and might indeed be true of the mindset for all of the pictures one takes!  This viewpoint is not limiting enough to provide some sort of focus.  For the purposes of this blog, I will share some pictures about the transiency of the sunrise and sunset, and of fog, and aircraft in the air.  If you are not there at the right place and at the right time, and under the right conditions, and if you do not react when needed, you have missed the transient phenomena.  You do not know how long you will have to wait to encounter the same situation again.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIMG_7692OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIMG_1353IMG_6911OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIMG_6757The

Weekly Photo Challenge: Evanescent

ev·a·nes·cent [evəˈnes(ə)nt]
adjective

  1. Soon passing out of sight, memory, or existence; quickly fading or disappearing.

In an expanded spirit of the theme, I have picked some pictures that may fit the theme in more ways than one.  These are all old pictures.  The situations that some of them represent can never be repeated.  Some of the others took place just because I happened to be in the right place at the right time, and this happened by chance, and it may never happen again.  They all have to do with memories.

The pictures below were taken in 2005 and 2006 respectively.  One had to be there at the right time of the year, at the right moment in time of the day, and on a day with the right conditions, to be able to see these.  The conditions along the C&O canal where these pictures were taken have also changed since the time I took them, so that these conditions may never be duplicated.  It was an evanescent moment in time that one could have said was a figment of my imagination if I did not have the pictures to show.100b1052100_3112The following picture is from 2009.  It was humid on that particular morning, and this caused the mist to rise from the railing on the bridge at Broad Run Trunk on the towpath.  I had never seen this before, and perhaps I will never see it again.  I just happened to be there at the right time.IMG_0616And then there is this series of pictures taken in 2009 of the train that appears out of the mist on a cool morning and then quickly vanishes from sight, as if it had never been there in the first place.  Nobody else was there to see it.  It was like that tree falling in the woods.  It was an evanescent experience that is only remembered today because of the pictures.IMG_0640IMG_0642IMG_0644IMG_0645The following picture is from 2005.   The broken-down building below used to be the Pennyfield Inn, and it used to be next to Pennyfield Lock. The building was built in 1879 and was finally demolished in 2009.  It is now replaced with an open space that feels like it has always been there.   (The building actually has an historical context in that President Grover Cleveland used to stay here during his fishing expeditions to this area.) The Pennyfield Inn is now just a memory.  It existed for only a fleeting moment in time in the grand scale of history, and now has disappeared. 100_0919This picture from 2005 illustrates the evanescence of the life experience.  One of the kids in this picture has just finished high school, the second is in college, and we just celebrated the college graduation of the third.   The circumstances of the old picture below are now but a distant memory.100_0344Here are other submissions to the challenge.

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Danger

We encounter situations with some element of danger every once in a while when we are in the outdoors.  The determination of whether a situation is dangerous or not can be a somewhat personal conclusion sometimes.

I myself experience a sense of danger when I witness activities that involve heights and steep drop-offs. I can sense a danger in the situations below even though there are safety features that are built into the activity.IMG_2013IMG_3077In the picture below, just seeing a person near the edge of a steep drop-off makes me feel that there there is an element of danger in the situation.  Perhaps the person involved is not as concerned as I am.IMG_4683White water rafting though rapids is an activity that looks very dangerous to me.  The adrenaline junkies who take part in this sport may disagree.  The heron in the picture below does not seem to care.IMG_5306Sometimes, when you do things that are dangerous, and when you put yourself at risk, you end up needing services like the one below where other people are also forced to put themselves in danger.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERASometimes dangerous situations are explicitly called out, especially if they are not that obvious. 100_0090IMG_8973Sometimes the warnings are needed simply to prevent people from doing something foolhardy in spite of  an obvious risk.IMG_9389Here is another example of the kind of danger you could face when you live near a river.IMG_2397People differ in their perception of danger, and they also react differently to what might be considered a dangerous situation.  In many cases there will even be disagreement about whether something is  dangerous or not.

Wanderlust

We have the wandering bug.  When we are on vacation, and especially when we are traveling by ourselves, we tend to explore places that are not always in the mainstream, and we will sometimes do so during seasons and under conditions that might not even be considered favorable for visiting.  We just do it!  Experiencing the unexpected brings with it an additional element of surprise, and an excitement and a joy, that at the end of the day elevates the vacation experience to a different level.  Witness our recent trip to Carson City in Nevada.

We have been quite fortunate to travel far and wide in recent years. For the purposes of this blog I will focus on some lesser-known places that the wanderlust took us to during our trip to Scotland in 2016. We visited at the tail end of the winter season, but the cold weather and the occasional rain did not stop us from enjoying our adventures.

Here we are on the bed of the River Garry at Killiecrankie.  The bed of the river is, for good reasons, not an advertised tourist destination. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThese pictures were taken at a remote location on the Isle of Skye where we stayed overnight.  It was getting towards sunset when we walked through open fields and the countryside to a stand of trees next to a mountain ridge.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt was raining steadily when we got to Rodel at the southern tip of the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere was a storm underway by the time we got to Hushinish at the southwest corner of the Isle of Harris in the Outer Hebrides.  The kids had to climb the far hill in the wind and rain, with only the sheep keeping them company, to try to get a glimpse of the Atlantic.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is Dun Carloway Broch.  It is thought to have been a fortification during roman times.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI wandered the streets of Stornoway in the Outer Hebrides early one morning before the town came to life.  There is a different perspective of a place that you get when you do something like this.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe hit the northernmost tip of the Outer Herbrides where we wandered through the fields along the cliffs beside the ocean towards the Butt of Lewis lighthouse.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERABack on the mainland we hiked the hill behind the town of Ullapool, the place where we were staying at for the night.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERATowards the end of the trip we drove along the remote northern coastline of mainland Scotland from Durness to John O’Groats.  There were many places where we were the only ones present!OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAYou can expect the unexpected when the wanderlust hits!

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Earth

A visit to Death Valley reminds you of the complexity of the natural processes that form this Earth.  This picture of Artist’s Palette, taken as the sun was setting, shows what is possible.  You get a fusion of many different colors all in one place that is quite hard to imagine.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

(According to the article in Wikipedia – These colors are caused by the oxidation of different metals (iron compounds produce red, pink and yellow, decomposition of tuff-derived mica produces green, and manganese produces purple).)

Weekly Photo Challenge: Atop

As a family that likes to spend time outdoors walking and hiking in the midst of nature, we frequently find ourselves atop different natural formations during many of our outings.  Here are some pictures taken during a  vacation in Scotland.  This first shot is atop a small hillock in Pentland Hills, just outside of Edinburgh.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA This cow was observing us from atop another of the hills in the park.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAA climb up yet another of the hillsOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAfound us atop a peak with a cairn.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe following picture is of us atop Arthur’s Seat in Edinburgh.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERASome of us feel the urge to explore any and all random hilltops that appear within our field of view. So it was that, while we were at Hushinish in the Outer Hebrides, and in the midst of gale force winds and pouring rain, the kids clambered atop a hillock that we sighted in the distance in order to see what lay beyond.  (Can you see them in the picture below?) The effort awarded them an unobstructed view of the Atlantic Ocean through the storm.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAnd this was the view of the North Sea from atop a cliff near the Butt of Lewis Lighthouse at the northern tip of the Outer Hebrides.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe climbed a hill behind the town of Ullapool on the western coast of mainland Scotland.  It was a long way to the top.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe got a view of Loch Achall (which had been hidden from view so far) from atop the hill.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is a picture of Loch Broom and the town of Ullapool from the hilltop.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe picture below includes The Minch, the strait that separates the mainland from the Outer Herbrides.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAFinally, here is a picture of us atop a cliff at Durness, along the northern coast of mainland Scotland.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere is almost always a thrill when one looks out over the distance from atop natural formations.